Year: 2017

Healthcare Summit – Disruptive Indian Healthcare Innovations for the World


Press Release: Healthcare Summit, held on 23rd December 2017 at Dayananda Sagar University, Hosur Road campus; discussed the future of the fast-evolving Healthcare sector and is of relevance to healthcare start-ups, academicians, policy makers, NGOs, social healthcare entrepreneurs and industry building innovative solutions in the healthcare space. 

The event was organised by World Economic Forum’s Global Shapers Bangalore Chapter in collaboration with Dayananda Sagar University & Autodesk.

Summit Agenda
To showcase applications of new age technologies in the field of Healthcare. How digital and hardware technological adoption in the field of healthcare, is making patient treatment better, therapies more effective and extending human longevity.


Summit Takeaways for audience

Event registration was via an online registration link and we had attendees from leading hospital management teams, healthcare professionals, startups, academic researchers, students and industry leaders. Audience learnt about the efforts being taken to create Make in India products for the global market and about Healthcare innovations globally and in India that will positively impact our lives in the next decade.


Welcome Speech

Role of academia in creating innovative thinking and programs run towards bridging the academia – industry divide

by Mr. R Janardhan – Pro Vice Chancellor, Dayananda Sagar University

  • DST Funded Startup Incubation centre
  • GE Healthcare, Nvidia, Autodesk and Bosch few of the many companies that have already set up labs within the Innovation centre on campus (DS University, Kudlu Gate, Hosur Road)
  • Set up of a privately funded Innovation Centre at Dayananda Sagar Innovation Campus to instil the spirit of entrepreneurship amongst students

Keynote
Precision Medicine and growth of personalized medicine in the 4th Industrial Revolution Era – creating policy and ecosystem to keep pace with innovation
by Dr. Vijay Chandru, CEO Strand Life Sciences and World Economic Forum Technology Pioneer Awardee

  • 1/3rd of India’s Biotech companies in Bangalore – Study by ABLE
  • Ecosystem is ripe for disruption in the field of personalised medicine
  • Discussion about the growth story of Strand Life Sciences, an independently held private company
  • Strand Life Sciences working towards creating affordable genomics solutions
  • Bioinformatics is today helping early screening for cancer and providing testing methods to determine probability for occurrence of a hereditary disease
  • World is moving towards personalised treatments and neo-natal gene modification is leading to a future where we will have “designer babies”
  • Strand has 30% market share in its segment and currently has both local and international clientele


Panel Discussion
Healthcare solutions for the masses. Indian Healthcare innovations for the World.

Dr. Vijay Chandru (CEO – Strand Life Sciences, World Economic Forum Technology Pioneer Awardee); 
Dr. Jagadish Mittur (Head – Biotechnology Facilitation Cell – KBITS, Department of IT BT and S&T, Government of Karnataka); 
Mr. K Chandrasekhar (CEO, Forus Health); 
Dr. Dheepa Srinivasan (Additive Manufacturing, General Electric); 
Mr. Anurag Ramdasan (Global Shapers Bangalore and VC at 3one4 Capital)


Key Highlights

Gene editing (CRISPR technology) has lots of potential in this fourth industrial revolution era and policy is being framed with Indian Council for Medical Research (ICMR) and Department of Biotechnology (DBT), to enable Indian innovators to stay ahead of the curve and innovate in the space of genomics – Dr. Vijay Chandru

Government of Karnataka was the first state to come up with a biotechnology policy (circa. 1999) and last month released the third updated version of the policy. Gov. of Kar is focussed towards creating clusters for innovation in healthcare (Bangalore Bio innovation Centre, IBAB); deploy funds for early/ growth stage start-ups via their Idea2PoC and Elevate funding programs; create quality human resource personnel (Bioinformatics graduate students from IBAB centre are in global demand for their skills). Government is also focusing on creating new clusters of innovation across the state – Hubli / Dharwad Agri-Tech cluster, Mangalore Marine Biotech cluster being some of the many to be set up. – Dr. Jagadish Mittur

3D Printing in Healthcare is a 3 Billion Dollar opportunity. GE is focused on utilising the power of additive manufacturing (3D Printing) to create affordable healthcare devices. Work with certifying aerospace grade parts similar to what needs to be done by medical sector to certify medical grade implants. Various advantages of using additive manufactured in designing medical grade implants, equipment and lab testing tools (3D Bioprinting). Solutions to cater to needs of India’s large diabetic population can come from 3D Printing. – Dr. Dheepa Srinivasan

Inspired by the Aravind Eye Hospital chain, Forus Healthcare set forth on their journey in 2010 to develop an affordable eye screening device with the goal to eradicate avoidable blindness. Their key product is 3nethra. Forus has sold products in 26+ countries and truly represents the Make in India for the World dream of our country’s Prime Minister. Ecosystem was supportive to provide inputs and collaboration, when they started off. Challenged faces along the way to building a global product company include lack of support from government run regulatory bodies, slow time from prototype to product. 
– Mr. K Chandrasekhar

Private VC firms already working with government to help their portfolio start-ups tackle various on ground challenges and to deploy technology to improve government efficiency in fields ranging from agriculture to IT. Most VC funds have a shorter life cycle than a deep tech focused life sciences company that is looking at 10-year plus gestation period. This requires exploring other routes for VCs to be able to work better with startups in this space with special structures, incentives and better liquidity through proposed SME exchanges. VC community will continue to better engage with the healthcare ecosystem with the goal of supporting novel Make in India Healthcare companies. – Mr. Anurag Ramdasan


We also had the following Healthcare companies and start-ups showcase their work through 10-minute presentations followed by audience Q&A

1. DocsApp: Doctor consultation and chat via Mobile Application
https://www.docsapp.in/

2. Niramai: Pre-screening AI tools for Breast cancer 
http://niramai.com/

3. Next Big Innovation Labs 3D Bioprinting: 3D Skin Tissues for cosmetic R&D testing & Maxillofacial Models for use as pre-surgical guides
http://nextbiglab.com/

4. Gangagen: Developing Drug Resistant Bacteria
http://www.gangagen.com/

5. Biodesign Innovation Labs: New age ventilator for emergency rooms accessible to the bottom of the pyramid 
http://biodesigninnovationlabs.com/

An event by Global Shapers Bangalore (World Economic Forum Chapter), Dayananda Sagar University and Autodesk

Event Photoshttps://goo.gl/HNJS2m


For Further Details regarding the event, please contact –
Mr. Alok Medikepura Anil -alokanil@gmail.com, +91 8971909120
Member of 3D Printing Expert Network
World Economic Forum & Global Shapers, Bangalore

Team HCITExperts

Your partner in Digital Health Transformation using innovative and insightful ideas

Artificial Intelligence #AI Could Add $957 Billion to Indian Economy, According to New Research by @AccentureIndia


In a recently published report by Accenture, they have highlighted the need for india to invest in AI, we bring you the excerpts of the report. (The following content is sourced from the Accenture report).

Artificial intelligence (AI) has reached a tipping point. The combination of the technology, data and talent that make intelligent systems possible has reached critical mass, driving extraordinary growth in AI investment. Across the world, G20 countries have been building up their AI capabilities. The power of AI starts with people and intelligent technologies working together within and across company boundaries to create better outcomes for customers and society. But India is not fully prepared to seize the enormous opportunities that AI presents. Even with a tech-savvy talent pool, renowned universities, healthy levels of entrepreneurship and strong corporations, the country lags on key indicators of AI development. Much work remains. 


The report, ‘Rewire for Growth,’ estimates that AI has the potential to increase India’s annual growth rate of gross value added (GVA) by 1.3 percentage points, lifting the country’s income by 15 percent in 2035. To avoid missing out on this opportunity, policy makers and business leaders must prepare for, and work toward, the AI revolution. 


The era of AI has arrived. Established companies are moving far beyond experimentation. Money is flowing into AI technologies and applications at large companies. The number of patents filed on AI technologies in G20 countries has increased at a more than 26 percent compound annual growth rate since 2010. Funding for AI startups has been growing at a compound annual growth rate of almost 60 percent.

AI is a new factor of production that can augment labor productivity and innovation while driving growth in at least three important ways:

Mobilize Intelligent Automation
Automate complex, physicalworld tasks that require adaptability and agility.

Empower Existing Workforces
Complement and enhance the skills and abilities of workforces.

Drive Innovations
Let AI be a catalyst for broad structural transformation of the economy. Do things differently, do different things.


The report points out AI is expected to raise India’s annual growth rate by 1.3 percentage points—in a scenario of intelligent machines and humans working together to solve the country’s most difficult problems in 2035

AI TENDING TO INDIA’S HEALTH
India’s healthcare providers have embraced artificial intelligence, recognizing its significant value in better diagnostics with data intelligence and in improving patient experience with AI-powered solutions.

Take Manipal Hospitals, headquartered in Bengaluru, which is using IBM Watson for Oncology, a cognitive-computing platform, to help physicians identify personalized cancer care options across the country.

In cardiac care, Columbia Asia Hospitals in Bengaluru is using startup Cardiotrack’s AI algorithms to predict and diagnose cardiac diseases, disorders, and ailments.

And in eye care, Aravind Eye Hospital is working with Google to use AI in ophthalmology for diabetic retinopathy screening. Also, the government of Telangana is planning to use Microsoft Intelligent Network for Eyecare (MINE), an AI platform, to reduce avoidable blindness, which would make it the first state in India to deploy AI for eye care screening as part of the Rashtriya Bal Swasthya Karyakram program under the National Health Mission.

Accenture, for its part, has developed an AI-powered smartphone solution to help the visually impaired improve the way they experience the world around them and enhance their productivity in the workplace. The solution, called
Drishti, was initially developed and tested through a collaboration with the National Association for the Blind in India.


AI has the potential to have a broad-based disruptive impact on society, creating a variety of economic benefits. While some of these benefits can be measured, others, such as consumer convenience and time savings, are far more intangible in nature. Our analysis focuses on measuring the GVA impact of AI.

Read the press release here >> 
https://newsroom.accenture.com/news/artificial-intelligence-could-add-957-billion-to-indian-economy-according-to-new-research-by-accenture.htm

Read the complete report here >> 
https://www.accenture.com/in-en/insight-ai-economic-growth-india

Author
Team HCITExperts

Your partner in Digital Health Transformation using innovative and insightful ideas

‘‘Doctor on the Go” Revolution Ready To Change The Reality of Healthcare by @Guneet_B

Digital technology in healthcare is booming at a rate that no one would ever have imagined. From smartphone apps to self-monitoring healthcare devices, the healthcare delivery system has started to change for the better.

Continue reading “‘‘Doctor on the Go” Revolution Ready To Change The Reality of Healthcare by @Guneet_B”

How are Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality Changing the Face of Healthcare Market? by @marketsmarkets


Healthcare being one of the most crucial sectors globally has seen immense transformation over the years. The use of modern day technologies in healthcare has made it possible for the physicians to deliver accurate diagnosis along with proper treatment. Virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) technologies are fast gaining prominence among various sectors, especially the healthcare sector. Over the past two decades, AR and VR have come a long way, with 2016 being a breakthrough year for both. They have revolutionized the healthcare industry with their rapid adoption in various areas of healthcare. It is now possible for the surgeons to see the virtual condition of a patient’s body parts and accordingly conduct minimally invasive surgery that have greater benefits in comparison to the traditional surgeries and treatments. The use of AR/VR modeling and 3D visualization is found to be helpful in the healthcare sector.

Market overview

The global augmented and virtual reality in healthcare market was valued at USD 769.2 Million in 2017, and is estimated to be worth USD 4,997.9 Million by 2023, growing at a CAGR of 36.6% between 2017 and 2023.

Based on type of devices, the head-mounted displays are expected to take up the majority of the market share, and also grow at a high rate over the forecast period. This growth can be majorly contributed to the increased use of HMDs in various applications such as pharmacy management, patient care management, and medical training and education. Also, the use of AR smart glass is further estimated to witness a high growth, thereby boosting the growth of the overall market.

Among applications, the patient care management application is projected to be the leading market, mainly due to the growing use of AR and VR technology in therapies and rehabilitation. However, the surgery application is predicted to grow at the highest rate over the forecast period, owing to the advantages of the AR and VR technologies used in operations and other procedures.

How is the market progressing, geographically?

Among regions, North America held the largest market share in 2016, and is also predicted to be the leading market for augmented reality and virtual reality in healthcare, owing to the cutting-edge technologies used in display devices due to its technologically advanced and developed nature. Moreover, the presence of a number of global companies involved in the AR and VR space for the healthcare applications in the U.S. market is also boosting the growth of this market. However, the market for augmented and virtual reality in healthcare in Asia-Pacific is expected to grow at the highest CAGR by 2023. 

This growth can be attributed to the increase in R&D and the rising acceptance of newer technologies in this region.

What is driving and restraining the market growth?

The growth of the worldwide market for augmented reality and virtual reality in healthcare is majorly being influenced by the following factors:

  • Need for reducing healthcare costs
  • Growing penetration of connected devices in the healthcare sector
  • Increasing investments in healthcare AR and VR


Apart from these, growing demand for AR and VR in emerging economies and usage in fitness management is further expected to create an array of opportunities for the growth of this market.

On the flip side, lack of expertise and knowledge among medical practitioners for the adoption of new technologies and incompetence in deployment of AR and VR solutions are the major factors likely to hinder the growth of this market. Moreover, concerns related to privacy of data, social challenges, and lack of compatibility and interoperability between vendors providing AR and VR solutions are the major challenges to be tackled by the players involved in this market.

Ask for Sample Pages @ 
http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/requestsample.asp?id=220832469

Major players and strategies adopted for sustenance

Google (US), Microsoft (US), DAQRI (US), Psious (Spain), Mindmaze (Switzerland), Firsthand Technology (US), Medical Realities (UK), Atheer (US), Augmedix (US), and Oculus VR (US) are some of the major players involved in the global augmented and virtual reality in healthcare market. These companies are increasingly adopting strategies such as major investments in AR and VR in healthcare and new product launches and developments in order to witness sustained growth as well as maintain their market position. Moreover, various other healthcare IT-enabled companies are venturing in this market in order to gain advantage of the high potential growth that this market has to offer.

About MarketsandMarkets™
MarketsandMarkets™ provides quantified B2B research on 30,000 high growth niche opportunities/threats which will impact 70% to 80% of worldwide companies’ revenues. Currently servicing 5000 customers worldwide including 80% of global Fortune 1000 companies as clients. Almost 75,000 top officers across eight industries worldwide approach MarketsandMarkets™ for their painpoints around revenues decisions.

Our 850 fulltime analyst and SMEs at MarketsandMarkets™ are tracking global high growth markets following the “Growth Engagement Model – GEM”. The GEM aims at proactive collaboration with the clients to identify new opportunities, identify most important customers, write “Attack, avoid and defend” strategies, identify sources of incremental revenues for both the company and its competitors. MarketsandMarkets™ now coming up with 1,500 MicroQuadrants (Positioning top players across leaders, emerging companies, innovators, strategic players) annually in high growth emerging segments. MarketsandMarkets™ is determined to benefit more than 10,000 companies this year for their revenue planning and help them take their innovations/disruptions early to the market by providing them research ahead of the curve.

MarketsandMarkets’s flagship competitive intelligence and market research platform, “RT” connects over 200,000 markets and entire value chains for deeper understanding of the unmet insights along with market sizing and forecasts of niche markets.

Report Contact:
Mr. Rohan
MarketsandMarkets™ INC. 
630 Dundee Road 
Suite 430 
Northbrook, IL 60062 
USA : 1-888-600-6441

Register to Attend “AI in Healthcare” Conference in 17th -18th May 2018 in Silicon Valley, USA


http://www.mnmconferences.com/Artificial-Intelligence-in-Healthcare

Write in to us at info [at] hcitexpert. com to avail special discount code for the conference


We need your opinion now – Respond to the Data Democracy Survey by @drvikram


Can patients manage their own healthcare records?

Healthcare records are a subject for an engaging discussion across the world. In India, we are just seeing the beginning of this debate. On one hand, many corporate hospitals have taken concrete measures to collect, maintain and drive insights from patient health records. While on the other hand valuable data is either not stored properly or is lying locked up in paper forms. Insights that could have saved lives are never collected.


In this context, we at Healthcare India are working on our next report on data democracy in healthcare. We have created a short survey which will help us capture the sentiments of our readers on this topic. We are also conducting interviews with healthcare leaders to get their views on the same.

The survey would take less than five minutes and will help us drive insights on this topic. Please click here to take the survey.

The responses are anonymous and we will rely on Survey Monkey technology to keep it secure.

We plan to release the report by the end of the year. Looking forward to seeing you all participate in the same.

Author

[tab]
[content title=”About Dr. Vikram Venkateswaran”]

Dr. Vikram Venkateswaran

Dr Vikram Venkateswaran is a healthcare thought leader who writes and speaks about the emerging healthcare models in India and the role technology plays in them.
Connect with me

[/content]
[content title=”Latest Articles”]

[/content] [/tab]

Streamlining New Horizons of Technology in Healthcare by @exploreevents1

About the event

In its 2nd year the Smart Tech Healthcare is one among the most dedicated conferences aimed at streamlining new horizons of technology in healthcare which provides a common platform for the industry and other stakeholders to come together to discuss the key challenges, learn from the best practices adopted across the country and ensure their firm is positioned to comply with digital health trends in the evolving industry. Today, our health care system has changed dramatically but it’s still too difficult for families in rural India to find quality, affordable health care.

The consumer health technologies — apps, telemedicine, wearables, self-diagnosis tools — which has the potential to strengthen the patient-physician connection and improve health outcomes in all sorts of technology-enabled ways, that’s the opportunity to learn, discuss the new trends in this summit.

With the success of the first annual Smart Tech Healthcare focused of redefining healthcare with IT & more than 250 attendees, 45 speakers, 9 supporting associations. The event is projected to be big with more than 350 attendees will be the most diverse gathering of public sector, health and technology industry leaders working at the intersection of innovative product and service development, research, business and policy throughout the world. Building thought leadership across the ecosystem, this year’s conference focuses on an increasingly business & consumer oriented, technology-enabled and collaborative approach to improving digital health.

Key Topics:

Here are the topics of discussion: 
* Storytelling in a Digital Age: Transforming healthcare 2030 with IT 
* Blockchain as an enabler of countrywide interoperability 
* Redesigning Healthcare: the future of Artificial Intelligence & Robotics 
* The future for Technology Enabled Care: How the industry realises the opportunities 
* Revolutionising the Internet of Health & Medical Things 
* Interoperability in the Post-EHR era 
* Payer-Provider Collaboration on Data: The Leading Edge. 
* In-depth analysis of today’s megatrends (VR, tele-everything, Robotics, wearables, digital therapies). 
* Deeper Dive: Understanding the Emerging Threats. 
* Population Health Strategies: Improved outcomes and care coordination.

Event Themes: 

Health Informatics, Telehealth, Business Intelligence, AI & Robotics, EHRS, Interoperability, Data Integration, Entrepreneurship & Venture Investment, Cyber Security, IOHT, Blockchain, Transforming healthcare, Artificial Intelligence, Big Data 

Who should Attend?

  • Hospital CEOs
  • Hospital Management Company Senior Management
  • Health Care Policy Personnel
  • Representatives of Hospital Supplier / Manufacturer / Distributor Companies
  • Vice Presidents of Sales and/or Marketing
  • Health Care Managers
  • Health Industry Analysts / Consultants

Why attend?

  • Learn about future healthcare technology
  • Hear from the leaders of healthcare  industry addressing future health care trends
  • Network with senior executives from hospital management companies and hospitals


 Register 



HCITExpert Blog is proud to be associated as a media partner for the event >>
http://www.exploreexhibitions.com/healthcare/index.php/partner/media-parters


<!– Place this data between the tags of your website –>
Streamlining New Horizons of Technology in Healthcare by @exploreevents1


A collection of Potential Usecases for #Blockchain in Healthcare

Every once in a while a new technology finds its way in the Gartner Hype Cycle for Technologies (in Healthcare) and its effectiveness and usability is applied to the management and interoperability of Healthcare Records. For instance, access to the Healthcare records by various stakeholders in the care continuum: care providers and patients. 



Gartner in their recent report defines Blockchain as a Digital Platform. And healthcare industry has been perennially on the lookout for a Digital Platform that will allow for an efficient and secure way to share patient data. Providing access to the healthcare data involves providing access to the patient data to relevant stakeholders at the right time and to the right person, not only ensuring the privacy but also providing the patient control of their data. 

Another problem that remains evasive in healthcare is driven by privacy of the patient data, and has been at times been seen to be impeding the flow of patient data between disparate systems, (i.e., Interoperability). 

We now have the Blockchain Technology and various companies are working to apply the technology to help solve not only the interoperability problem but also applying the same technology to solve various usecases in the Care Continuum, to save costs, improve efficiency, ensure privacy.

So what are the problems Blockchain is being applied to in the Healthcare context? What are the benefits one would accrue by applying Blockchain to Healthcare and what are the pitfalls.

The past august, ONC in the US setout a Blockchain challenge with the objective, 

The goal of this Ideation Challenge is to solicit White Papers that investigate the relationship between Blockchain technology and its use in Health IT and/or health-related research. The paper should discuss the cryptography and underlying fundamentals of Blockchain technology, examine how the use of Blockchain can advance industry interoperability needs expressed in the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology’s (ONC) Shared Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap, as well as for Patient Centered Outcomes Research (PCOR), the Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI), delivery system reform, and other healthcare delivery needs, as well as provide recommendations for Blockchain’s implementation. In addition to a monetary award, winners may also have the opportunity to present their White Papers at an industry-wide “Blockchain & Healthcare Workshop” co- hosted by ONC and NIST.”

As part of the Ideation Challenge, the following papers were the declared winners:

1. Blockchain and Health IT: Algorithms, Privacy, and Data: This papers discusses the need to create a peer-to- peer network that enables parties to jointly store and analyze data with complete privacy, based on highly optimized version of multi-party computation with a secret-sharing. An auditable, tamper-proof distributed ledger (a permissioned blockchain) records and controls access through smart contracts and digital identities. We conclude with an initial use case of OPAL/Enigma that could empower precision medicine clinical trials and research. 
Authors:  Ackerman Shrier A, Chang A, Diakun-thibalt N, Forni L, Landa F, Mayo J, van Riezen R, Hardjono, T.
Organization:  Project PharmOrchard of MIT’s Experimental Learning “MIT FinTech: Future Commerce.”


2. Blockchain: Securing a New Health Interoperability Experience: Blockchain technologies solutions can support many existing health care business processes, improve data integrity and enable at-scale interoperability for information exchange, patient tracking, identity assurance, and validation. This paper suggests these processes can be supported by three most important applications: Creating secured and trusted care records, linking identities and recording patient consent decisions and patient directives within the secured patient record.
Authors:  Brodersen C, Kalis B, Mitchell E, Pupo E, Triscott A.
Organization:  Accenture LLP


3. Blockchain Technologies: A Whitepaper Discussing how Claims Process can be Improved: Smart contracts, Blockchain, and other technologies can be combined into a platform that enables drastic improvements to the claims process and improves the health care experience for all stakeholders. The healthcare industry suffers from an inability to clearly communicate costs in a timely and easy-to-understand format. This problem is a symptom of interoperability issues and complex agreements between providers, patients, health plans/payers and government regulators. These agreements are encoded in legal language with the intent of being defensible in court. However, the focus on legal enforceability, instead of understandability, creates problems resulting in hundreds of billions of dollars spent annually to administer an inefficient, outdated and complex process for adjudicating and paying health plan claims. 

The process results in errors and often leaves the patient unclear on how much they need to pay. If these agreements were instead translated into computer code (smart contracts) leveraging Blockchain technologies, the claim process would not only be interoperable, but also drive standardization, research and innovation. Transparency and trust can be injected into the process when both the logic and the data driving these decisions is stored permanently and made available to all stakeholders through a peer-to- peer distributed database like blockchain. The result will be a paradigm shift toward interoperability and transparency, enhancing the speed and accuracy of cost reporting to patients. This paper discusses how smart contracts, blockchain and other technologies can be combined into a platform that enables drastic improvements to the healthcare experience for all stakeholders.
Author:  Culver K. 


4. Blockchain: A new model for Health Information Exchanges: Presentation of an implementation framework and business case for using Blockchain as part of health information exchange to satisfy national health care objectives.


Authors:  Krawiec RJ, Barr D, Killmeyer K, Filipova M, Nesbit A, Israel A, Quarre F, Fedosva  K, Tsai L.
Organization:  Deloitte Consulting LLP

5. A Case Study for Blockchain in Healthcare: “MedRec” Prototype for Electronic Health Records and Medical Research Data: A long-standing focus on compliance has traditionally constrained development of fundamental design changes for Electronic Health Records (EHRs). We now face a critical need for such innovation, as personalization and data science prompt patients to engage in the details of their healthcare and restore agency over their medical data. 

In this paper, the authors propose MedRec: a novel, decentralized record management system to handle EHRs, using blockchain technology. The system gives patients a comprehensive, immutable log and easy access to their medical information across providers and treatment sites. Leveraging unique blockchain properties, MedRec manages authentication, confidentiality, accountability and data sharing—crucial considerations when handling sensitive information. A modular design integrates with providers’ existing, local data storage solutions, facilitating interoperability and making our system convenient and adaptable. 

MedRec incentivize medical stakeholders (researchers, public health authorities, etc.) to participate in the network as blockchain “miners”. This provides them with access to aggregate, anonymized data as mining rewards, in return for sustaining and securing the network via Proof of Work. MedRec thus enables the emergence of data economics, supplying big data to empower researchers while engaging patients and providers in the choice to release metadata. 

The purpose of this paper is to expose, in preparation for field tests, a working prototype through which we analyze and discuss our approach and the potential for blockchain in health IT and research.
Authors:  Ekblaw A, Azaria A, Halamka J, Lippman A. 
Organizations:  MIT Media Lab, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center


6. The Use of a Blockchain to Foster the Development of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs): This paper suggests the use of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy as a modality to treat Mental Health disorders. This the author suggests is achieved by the use of various applications that allow the patient to record information using SMS or applications. These applications keep track of any emergencies, provides patient coaching and guidance, recording of daily progress and medication adherence. While many patients feel ashamed of their mental state and feel a stigma associated with conditions such as depression and anxiety, the anonymous nature of these applications may make it more likely for them to seek help. 

These types of use cases are the first step in implementing blockchain technology as they help identify the system requirements and looks at the interactions between users and systems. In this case, the focus would be on personal health information that is highly sensitive and coming from mobile applications that require direct interaction between the patient and providers, as well as those involved in the care of the patient. 

Each scenario that involves a transaction, or data being transferred from the application to those who have “signed” the transaction would be documented so the information flow and usage is understood. In this manner, the appropriate permissions would be granted and provenance could readily be established. Use of the Internet of Things in combination with Blockchain technology for Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs).
Author:  Goldwater JC.
Organization:  National Quality Forum

7. Powering the Physician Patient Relationship with ‘HIE of One’ Blockchain Health IT: ‘HIE of One’ links patient protected health information (PHI) to Blockchain identities and Blockchain identities to verified credential provider institutions to lower transaction costs and improves security for all participants. 

HIE of One, (Health Information Exchange of One) shifts the trusted intermediary role away from the hospital and into the blockchain. The blockchain can also provide the link between physician credentials and patient identity.
Author:  Gropper A.

8. Blockchain: The Chain of Trust and its Potential to Transform Healthcare – Our Point of View: This paper talks about Potential uses of Blockchain technology in health care including a detailed look at health care pre-authorization payment infrastructure, counterfeit drug prevention and detection and clinical trial results use cases. The paper also highlights what Blockchain is not. Some of the additional usecases as presented in the paper are listed below:


Organization:  IBM Global Business Service Public Sector

9. Moving Toward a Blockchain-based Method for the Secure Storage of Patient Records: Use of Blockchain as a novel approach to secure health data storage, implementation obstacles, and a plan for transitioning incrementally from current technology to a Blockchain solution. The author suggests a practical first step towards moving towards a blockchain enabled world, here is a suggested workflow by the author, from the submission: 

Author:  Ivan D.

10. ModelChain: Decentralized Privacy-Preserving Health Care Predictive Modeling Framework on Private Blockchain Networks:   ModelChain, to adapt Blockchain technology for privacy-preserving machine learning. Each participating site contributes to model parameter estimation without revealing any patient health information (i.e., only model data, no observation-level data, are exchanged across institutions). 

We integrate privacy- preserving online machine learning with a private Blockchain network, apply transaction metadata to disseminate partial models, and design a new proof-of-information algorithm to determine the order of the online learning process. 

We also discuss the benefits and potential issues of applying Blockchain technology to solve the privacy-preserving healthcare predictive modeling task and to increase interoperability between institutions, to support the Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap and national healthcare delivery priorities such as Patient-Centered Outcomes Research (PCOR).
Authors:  Kuo T, Hsu C, Ohno-Machado L.
Organizations:  Health System Department of Biomedical Informatics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA Division of Health Services Research & Development, VA San Diego Healthcare System.


11. Blockchain for Health Data and Its Potential Use in Health IT and Health Care Related Research: A look at Blockchain based access-control manager to health records that advances the industry interoperability challenges expressed in ONC’s Shared Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap.
In this usecase the authors discuss the use of blockchain technology with a data lake for scalability. All medical data would be stored off blockchain in a data repository called a data lake. Data lakes are highly scalable and can store a wide variety of data, from images to documents to key- value stores

When a health care provider creates a medical record (prescription, lab test, pathology result, MRI) a digital signature would be created to verify authenticity of the document or image. The health data would be encrypted and sent to the data lake for storage. Every time information is saved to the data lake a pointer to the health record is registered in the blockchain along with the user’s unique identifier. The patient is notified that health data was added to his blockchain. In the same fashion a patient would be able to add health data with digital signatures and encryption from mobile applications and wearable sensors.



Authors:  Linn L, Koo M.

12. A Blockchain-Based Approach to Health Information Exchange Networks: 
Sharing healthcare data between institutions is challenging. Heterogeneous data structures may preclude compatibility, while disparate use of healthcare terminology limits data comprehension. 

Even if structure and semantics could be agreed upon, both security and data consistency concerns abound. Centralized data stores and authority providers are attractive targets for cyber attack, and establishing a consistent view of the patient record across a data sharing network is problematic. 

In this work we present a Blockchain-based approach to sharing patient data. This approach trades a single centralized source of trust in favor of network consensus, and predicates consensus on proof of structural and semantic interoperability.

The authors describe the Healthcare Blockchain as: 

Because a blockchain is a general-purpose data structure, it is possible to apply it to domains other than digital currency. Healthcare, we believe, is one such domain. The challenges of a patient record are not unlike those of a distributed ledger. For example, a patient may receive care at multiple institutions. From the patient’s point of view, their record is a single series of sequential care events, regardless of where these events were performed. This notion of shared state across entities, inherent to the blockchain model, is congruent with patient expectations. Also, it is reasonable to assume that each patient care event was influenced by one or more events before it. For example, a prescription may be issued only after a positive lab test was received. The notion of historical care influencing present decisions fits well into the blockchain model, where the identity of a present event is dependent on all past events.

Much like the Bitcoin approach, our block is a Merkle Tree-based structure[21]. The leaf nodes of this tree represent patient record transactions, and describe the addition of a resource to the official patient record. Transactions, however, do not include the actual record document. Instead, they reference FHIR Resources via Uniform Resource Locators (URLs). This allows institutions to retain operational control of their data, but more importantly, keeps sensitive patient data out of the blockchain. FHIR was chosen as a exchange format not only because it is an emerging standard, but also because it contains inherent support for provenance and audit trails, making it a suitable symbiotic foundation for blockchain ledger entries. FHIR in conjunction with the blockchain can serve to preserve the integrity and associated context of data transactions.


A Blockchain-based approach to sharing patient data that trades a single centralized source of trust in favor of network consensus, and predicates consensus on proof of structural and semantic interoperability.
Authors:  Peterson K, Deedvanu R, Kanjamala P, Boles K.
Organization:  Mayo Clinic


13. Adoption of Blockchain to enable the Scalability and Adoption of Accountable Care:  A new digital health care delivery model that uses Blockchain as a foundation to enable peer-to-peer authorization and authentication.

The recent trends in Accountable Care based payment models have necessitated the adoption of new process for care delivery that requires the co-ordination of a “network” of care providers who can engage in shared risk contracts. In addition, the need for sharing in the savings generated equitably is key to encourage the network providers to invest in improved care paradigms. 

Current approaches to digitize healthcare focus on improvement of operational efficiency, like electronic records as well as care collaboration software. However, these approaches are still based on the classical centralized authorization model, that results in significant expense in implementation. These approaches are fundamentally limited in their ability to fully capitalize on the peer-to-peer digital work- flow revolution that is sweeping other segments of industry like media, e-retail etc. 

In this paper the author formulates a new digital health care delivery model that uses block chain as the foundation to enable peer-to-peer authorization and authentication. The author will also discuss how this foundation would transform the scalability of the care delivery network as well as enable payment process via smart contracts, resulting in significant reduction in operational cost and improvement in care delivery. 

In addition, this block-chain based framework can be applied to enable a new class of accountable tele-monitoring and tele-medication devices that would dramatically improve patient care adherence and wellness. Finally, the adoption of block chain based digital-health would enable the creation of varifiable “personalized longitudinal care” record that can form the basis of personalized medicine.

Author:  Prakash R.



14. A Blockchain Profile for Medicaid Applicants and Recipients: A solution to the problem churning in the Medicaid program that illustrates how health IT and health research could leverage Blockchain-based innovations and emerging artificial intelligence systems to develop new models of health care delivery. The solution envisions a Smart Health Profile by thinking of the blockchain profile simply as a broker that can answer questions about you as the need arises, your identity remains distributed. No one can ever see everything about you at once, including yourself. 

What makes the profile smart is that the services it provides can be quite intelligent. It can make sophisticated queries and actually trigger an action when certain conditions are met. For example, suppose you had a smart drug dispenser that recorded every dose you take as a transaction on the blockchain. A profile service might check everyday to see if you’ve taken your pill and automatically order a refill when you’ve used up all the pills. Over time, however, an AI service might become much more sophisticated to use a combination of information about your vital statistics from your wearable device and population studies of people using the various medications for your condition and either recommend a different regimen to your physician or simply cut out the middleman and direct your pharmacist to deliver you a new prescription.

The solution goes on to discuss the use of Blockchain in a medicaid scenario and a much more comprehensive solution as a distributed infrastructure for health.
Authors:  Vian K, Voto A, Haynes-Sanstead K.
Organization:  Blockchain Futures Lab – Institute for the Future


15. Blockchain & Alternate Payment Models:  Blockchain technology has the potential to assist organizations using alternative payment models in developing IT platforms that would help link quality and value.
Author:  Yip K.


References
The content provided in the examples above have been collated from the various submissions to the ONC’s Blockchain Ideation Challenge. You can write to me or connect with me, in case you are interested in receiving the copy of the documents.

In my previous article on Blockchain I shared whats Blockchain and types of Blockchain. I also discussed some of the usecases companies and startups have focussed on developing Blockchain based solutions. In this article I will share some of the usecases based on Blockchain technology, in healthcare. 

Alternatively, you could follow the links here

You can also review the various articles on Blockchain on the HCITExpert Blog.

[1]: Blockchain Articles by David Houlding:
https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidhoulding/detail/recent-activity/posts/

Author

[tab]
[content title=”About Manish Sharma” icon=”fa-heart”]

Manish Sharma

Founder HCITExpert.com, Digital Health Entrepreneur

Connect with me via any of my Social Media Channels

[/content]
[content title=”Latest Articles”]

[/content] [/tab]

Cybersecurity Trends in 2017

Cybersecurity is in the news almost daily and Investment in cybersecurity, by established corporations or venture capital is rising. The stature and business significance of cybersecurity operations within organisations continues its rise to a strategic management issue in every organisation. A dearth of skills shortage continues to impede the progress of a successful cyber defense strategy that can be put in place, this is driving most organizations to increasingly look for outside help be entering into consulting and managed security services contracts.

Rapid Increase in the Investment in Cybersecurity

  • According to Gartner, worldwide spending on cybersecurity increased by 7% as compared to last year and will reach $86.4 billion in 2017.
  • Spending on both cybersecurity services and products is expected to keep growing into 2018, reaching $93 billion by the end of the year.
  • An Enterprise Strategy Group (ESG) survey found that for 39% of organizations, improving cybersecurity is the most important business initiative driving IT spending in 2017 and that 69% of organizations are increasing their cybersecurity budgets in this year alone. 
  • 81% of cybersecurity professionals agree that improving security analytics and operations is a high priority at their organizations.
  • Cybersecurity startup funding hit an all-time quarterly high in terms of number of deals in the first quarter of 2017, up 26% from the previous quarterly high. The trend held through the second quarter, which saw just one fewer deal (145 total) compared to the previous quarter. 
  • The amount of disclosed equity funding to cybersecurity companies has also recently broken records, reaching an all-time quarterly high of $1.6 billion in the second quarter of 2017, according to CB Insights.

From cybersecurity operations into strategic Digital Risk Management

Organizations today generally think of cyber-risk as internal network penetration and defense. But there is now a shift towards developing a more comprehensive risk management strategy that includes all the digital assests such as – websites, social networks, partner exposure, branding and reputation management and compliance. 
Says ESG: “Comprehensive Risk Management Strategy is a more holistic digital risk strategy designed to analyze threat intelligence, monitor deep web activities, track the posting of sensitive data, and overseeing third parties and partners.”
With the transformation of cybersecurity into comprehensive risk management, Gartner predicts that by 2020, 100% of large enterprises will be asked to report to their board of directors on cybersecurity and technology risk at least annually, which is an increase from today’s 40%. 
The key in presenting to the board, says Gartner, is to connect the cybersecurity program goals to business risks. An example would be a discussion of implementing a process for managing third-party risk to support a business’s cloud strategy.
Cybersecurity skills shortage, a problem needing attention
There are currently more than 348,000 open security positions, according to CyberSeek. By 2022, there will be 1.8 million unfilled positions, according to the Center for Cyber Safety and Education. And The industry needs and will continue to need new kinds of skills as cybersecurity evolves in areas such as data classes and data governance, says Gartner
According to the ESG Survey, Things aren’t improving at all, some survey results:
In 2016, 46% of organizations reported a problematic shortage of cybersecurity skills. In 2017, the research is statistically the same as last year; 45% of organizations say they have a problematic shortage of cybersecurity skills.
According to 2016 research conducted by ESG and the Information Systems Security Association (ISSA), 33% of respondents said that their biggest shortage of cybersecurity skills was in security analysis and investigations. Security analysis and investigations represented the highest shortage of all security skill sets.
Recent ESG research reveals that 54% of survey respondents believe that their cybersecurity analytics and operations skill levels are inappropriate, while 57% of survey respondents believe that their cybersecurity analytics and operations staff size is inappropriate.
The ramifications of skills and staff deficiencies are also apparent in the research. Cybersecurity operations staffs are particularly weak at things like threat hunting, assessing and prioritizing security alerts, computer forensics, and tracking the lifecycle of security incidents.
CISOs propose an easy fix: companies must work towards hiring more cybersecurity staff to bridge the knowledge and staffing gaps. In fact, 81% of the cybersecurity professionals surveyed say that their organization plan to add cybersecurity headcount this year.
However, its not that simple to do. According to the ESG research, 18% of organizations find it extremely difficult to recruit and hire additional staff for cybersecurity analytics and operations jobs while another 63% find it somewhat difficult to recruit and hire additional staff for cybersecurity analytics and operations.
Gartner recommends focusing the cybersecurity team on the most important tasks and automating the manual ones, such as log reviews. It tells CISOs to review their job listings to see if they are hiring for positions that can be outsourced.
Managed Security Services, SaaS and ITO route to managing security
All organizations need cybersecurity help, says ESG. When companies buy security tools, the product contracts include a professional services component that allow the companies to manage and ensure optimal usage of their security portfolio. CISOs can leverage the MSSPs and SaaS providers to outsource the relevant areas of their security portfolio.
According to Gartner, 40% of all managed security service (MSS) contracts in 2020 will be bundled with other security services and broader IT outsourcing (ITO) projects, up from 20% today. 
To deal with the complexity of designing, building and operating a mature security program in a short space of time, says Gartner, many large organizations are looking to security consulting and ITO providers that offer customizable delivery components that are sold with the MSS. 
As ITO providers and security consulting firms improve the maturity of the MSS they offer, customers will have a much broader range of bundling and service packaging options through which to consume MSS offerings. The large contract sizes associated with ITO and security outsourcing deals will drive significant growth for the MSS market through 2020.
IDC estimates that services will be the largest area of security-related spending over the next five years, led by three of the five largest technology categories: managed security services, integration services, and consulting services. 
Together, companies will spend nearly $31.2 billion, more than 38% of the worldwide total, on these three categories in 2017.
Increased confidence in cloud cybersecurity
Just about 5 years ago, concerns about adequate security were cited as one of the top reasons for not moving IT operations and assets to the cloud. This thinking has recently changed, accompanied by rapid cloud adoption by many large corporations. A recent survey by analyst firm ESG has found “improved security” reported as a benefit that has been realized by 42% of organizations that already leverage cloud-based data protection services.
Gartner explains the potential key benefit of cybersecurity in the cloud: Today’s data centers support workloads that typically run in several different places—physical machines, virtual machines, containers, and private and public cloud. Cloud workload protection platforms provide a single management console and a single way to express security policy, regardless of where the workload runs.
While there are known benefits of moving the security services to the cloud, Gartner warns that as the cloud environment reaches maturity, it’s becoming an increasing security target. As with most services, possibility of the cloud based security services being targeted and the rendering the service unstable and insecure. Organisations therefore should work on developing security guidelines as to how they use private and public cloud and prepare a cloud risks model.
AI and machine learning (ML) driven Cloud Security
ML algorithms have the ability and potential to help with employee productivity & security analytics, but the technology is in its infancy and not well understood, says ESG.  A survey of 412 cybersecurity professionals asked them to assess and characterize their knowledge of machine learning/artificial intelligence as it relates to cybersecurity analytics and operations technologies. Of the total survey population, only 30% of respondents claim to be very knowledgeable in this area. In other words, 70% of cybersecurity professionals really don’t understand where machine learning and AI fit their security portfolio.
Additionally, cybersecurity pros were asked about the status of deploying or are planning to deploy machine learning/AI technologies for cybersecurity analytics and operations in their respective organisations.
Only 12% say that their organization has done so extensively and 6% of respondents have no plans to deploy machine learning/AI technologies for cybersecurity analytics and operations. In the long run, most of the cybersecurity professionals did see the potential of AI and machine learning to help with automating manual tasks and ensure the management of skill shortage in the area.

p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; text-align: justify; font: 18.0px ‘Helvetica Neue’; color: #454545} p.p3 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; text-align: justify; font: 18.0px ‘Helvetica Neue’; color: #454545; min-height: 22.0px} li.li2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 18.0px ‘Helvetica Neue’; color: #454545} span.s1 {font: 10.0px Menlo} span.s2 {text-decoration: underline ; color: #e4af0a} ul.ul1 {list-style-type: disc}

Its is important that organisations take the effort to gain knowledge about AI and ML and how it will impact Cybersecurity Services and Products. This way they will be able to be more proactive to understanding the adversarial capabilities of hackers. Many companies employ ethical hackers to find out the loop holes in their security portfolios and protocols.

Author
Team HCITExperts

Your partner in Digital Health Transformation using innovative and insightful ideas

Build #MVP to gather customer intelligence!! by @tejasvdeshmukh #health2con

Over the years working in Healthcare, witnessed endless innovation across the technology landscape over last few years. This is only due to the aspiring moguls who understand the crux of business and would like to capitalize on specific problems using new approaches.
Innovation is everywhere, be it harnessing the data power for population health or using advanced technology to enhance digital health. From Outcome Health, Livongo… toPriorAuthNow, each one of them have addressed a specific healthcare challenge in a unique way. Enhancing clinical outcomes, access to care, and improved operational efficiencies.
We are now living in the era of innovation!!

Startups are exploding in numbers; it’s very common to see a bunch of college drop-outs or professionals working extra hours to build their dream product. They strongly believe in their solution disrupt the way healthcare is delivered today.
All innovations begin with an idea, a futuristic thought, to solve current challenges. As an innovator, one needs to have strong business understanding and analytical skills to identify solutions addressing day-to-day challenges. Before building any product, one should figure out what problem is being solved and for whom. This perhaps is the first step to gauge success of a product.
Validate your idea by doing a competitor analysis and identify product uniqueness. Always be open to good ideas and also learn from competitor’s mistakes.
Once you put together all these pieces you begin your transition from ideation towards building minimal viable product.
Fig 1: MVP Process- Building Minimum Desirable Product
First step of building MVP is to define the user workflows (needless to say you understand the needs of different users). List all features that will be part of the entire product, as much as possible (it’s an evolving process). Prioritize features and group them into high value must-to-have vs potentially good-to-have. Once this exercise is complete, you may begin the development phase (Build-Test-Learn).
Most innovators fail to understand the real objective of MVP. It is to build product with minimum feature for visionaries and few initial customers, in other words we are selling a vision and not a product. Minimal viable product is all about translating end-user expectations.
Fig 2: Success formula for building MVP
Another key factor to ensure successful MVP is to leverage existing solutions that satisfy part of your  business workflows. For example: solutions like Pokitdok for Insurance verification, Validic for device integration, Vidyo for video collaboration, Twilio for secure messaging, MirthConnect as interface engine and many more. This is a much smarter approach than building all features from scratch. Why re-invent the wheel if someone has already solved that piece of puzzle. Our aim should be to design the core, the absolute essential features, with a unique proposition supporting seamless integration into existing workflows.
Early adopters should be convinced with the ease, usability, and value that the solution will add. MVP will help you to gather sufficient customer intelligence that will define the future development needs. Thus building a MVP will be your most valuable asset that will determine your success, and you will need a dynamic technology team to help you take off the idea.
We, at Faichi Solutions, are assisting innovative ideas to  quickly convert into MVP. We convert idea/ design into mature, scalable product, thus improving your chances to get next round of funding. We bring expertise like Population Health Management, Digital Health and Telemedicine, Remote Health Monitoring, mHealth, Enterprise system development, and Integrated Care Management. This helps startups to reduce overall development time to merely 12 to 16 weeks (within a budget of USD 60k to 85k, depending on the complexity of the product design). With experienced resources in healthcare, inherent Silicon Valley culture, we bring in two most valuable attribute Technology and Team, to your success.
Happy to connect with people with innovative ideas who are sitting on the fence (or otherwise) and itching to build a MVP.
Author
Tejas Deshmukh

Highly skilled and motivated professional with rich experience of 13+ years in software product development for Healthcare and Life Sciences vertical, proven track record of building innovative solutions, providing strategic consulting, pre-sales and operational management.

The Return of the Wearables, in a New Avatar by @msharmas

IDC: Smartwatches accelerate in the second quarter, Device shipments grew 10.3% year over year to hit 26.3 million units during the second quarter of 2017; smartwatches grew 60.9%.


We are seeing the transformation of the wearables market with the total shipment volumes expected to maintain their forward momentum. According to the International Data Corporation’s (IDC) Worldwide Quarterly Wearable Device Tracker, vendors will ship a total of 125.5 million wearable devices this year, marking a 20.4% increase from the 104.3 million units shipped in 2016From there, the wearables market will nearly double before reaching a total of 240.1 million units shipped in 2021, resulting in a five-year CAGR of 18.2%. [1]


The wearables market is entering a new phase


In the first phase of the market development, it was about getting the product out, to generate awareness and interest and getting the customers accustomed to the idea. This opportunity remains to be explored by the traditional and fashion brands as the scale of consumer electronics market evolves. Now, the wearables market is entering a new phase, opines IDC’s Ramon T. Llamas.

Now it’s about getting the experience right – from the way the hardware looks and feels to how software collects, analyzes, and presents insightful data. What this means for users is that in the years ahead, they will be treated to second- and third-generation devices that will make the today’s devices seem quaint. Expect digital assistants, cellular connectivity, and connections to larger systems, both at home and at work. At the same time, expect to see a proliferation in the diversity of devices brought to market, and a decline in prices that will make these more affordable to a larger crowd.” [1] 


The phase 2 of the wearables development appears to be about taking the user data and provide analytics around the data to provide insights to the user, like step counts translate into a healthier heart. In this phase its about getting the customer to see the devices that actually augment the abilities to make lives easier, healthier and more productive, rather than another screen for the user. [3]

    Top Wearable Products [1]


    Watches: account for the majority of all wearable devices shipped during the forecast period. The report however shows that the basic watches (devices that do not run third party applications, including hybrid watches, fitness/GPS watches, and most kid watches) will continue out-ship smart watches (devices capable of running third party applications, like Apple Watch, Samsung Gear, and all Android Wear devices), as numerous traditional watch makers shift more resources to building hybrid watches, creating a greater TAM each year. The report suggests that the Smart watches, however, will see a boost in volumes in 2019 as cellular connectivity on the watches becomes more prevalent on the market.

    Wrist Bands: The report indicates a slow down in the market for the wristbands from 2016 onwards, but the market will be propped up with low-cost devices with good enough features for the mass market. However, the trend seems to focus on the users transitioning to watches for additional utility and multi-purpose use.

    Earwear: (this excludes the bluetooth headsets) are not counting. Instead, the report focusses on those devices that bring additional functionality, and sends information back and forth to a smartphone application. Examples include Bragi’s Dash and Samsung Gear Icon X. The report, also suggests the increase in the uptake of smarter earwear that centers on collecting fitness data about the user, real-time audio filtering or language translation.

    Clothing:  The smart clothing market took a strong step forward driven by the chines vendors providing connected apparel. The growth in this segment is seen to be driven by the adoption of the connected clothing by the professional athletes and organizations have warmed to their usage to improve player performance. For instance, the upcoming release of Google and Levi’s Project Jacquared-enabled jacket.

    Others: include lesser known products like clip-on devices, non-AR/VR eyewear, and others into this category. It will include vendors catering to niche audiences with creative new devices and uses.

    Top Wearable Devices by Product, Volume, Market Share, and CAGR [1]
    Product Shipment Volume 2017 Market Share 2017 Shipment Volume 2021* Market Share 2021* CAGR (2017-2021)*
    Watches 71.4 56.9% 161.0 67.0% 26.5%
    Wristbands 47.6 37.9% 52.2 21.7% 1.2%
    Clothing 3.3 2.6% 21.6 9.0% 76.1%
    Earwear 1.6 1.3% 4.0 1.7% 39.7%
    Others 1.6 1.3% 1.4 0.6% -16.0%
    Total 125.5 100.0% 240.1 100.0% 18.2%
    Source: IDC Worldwide Quarterly Wearables Device Tracker, June 21, 2017

    Global wearables market to grow 17% in 2017, 310M devices sold, $30.5BN revenue: Gartner | TechCrunch http://ow.ly/YFVu30eWQHL

    Like any technology market, the wearables market is changing [2]
    “Like any technology market, the wearables market is changing,” noted Ramon Llamas, research manager for IDC’s Wearables team. “Basic wearables started out as single-purpose devices tracking footsteps and are morphing into multi-purpose wearable devices, fusing together multiple health and fitness capabilities and smartphone notifications. It’s enough to blur the lines against most smart wearables, to the point where first generation smartwatches are no better than most fitness trackers, he says.

    Beyond the top 5 vendors of the wearables market, new entrants like fashion icons Fossil along with their sub-brands and emerging companies like BBK and Li-Ning, are tapping into niche segments of the wearables market. Fossil, is coming up with a luxury/fashion device, BBK focuses on child-monitoring devices and Li-Ning on step-counting shoes.

    “With the entrance of multiple new vendors with strengths in different industries, the wearables market is expected to maintain a positive outlook, though much of this growth is coming from vendor push rather than consumer demand,” said Jitesh Ubrani senior research analyst for IDC Mobile Device Trackers. “As the technology disappears into the background, hybrid watches and other fashion accessories with fitness tracking are starting to gain traction. This presents an opportunity to sell multiple wearables to a single consumer under the guise of ‘fashion.’ But more importantly, it helps build an ecosystem and helps vendors provide consumers with actionable insights thanks to the large amounts of data collected behind the scenes.”

    Top Five Wearable Device Vendors, Shipments, Market Share and Year-Over-Year Growth, 4Q 2016 (Units in Millions) [2]
    Vendor 4Q16 Unit Shipments 4Q16 Market Share 4Q15 Unit Shipments 4Q15 Market Share Year-Over-Year Growth
    1. Fitbit* 6.5 19.2% 8.4 29.0% -22.7%
    2. Xiaomi 5.2 15.2% 2.6 9.1% 96.2%
    3. Apple 4.6 13.6% 4.1 14.1% 13.0%
    4. Garmin 2.1 6.2% 2.2 7.6% -4.0%
    5. Samsung 1.9 5.6% 1.4 4.7% 37.9%
    Others 13.6 40.1% 10.3 35.5% 32.1%
    Total 33.9 100.0% 29.0 100.0% 16.9%
    Source: IDC Worldwide Quarterly Wearable Device Tracker, March 2, 2017

    Implications of Wearables in Healthcare


    Llamas, IDC. “Health and fitness remains a major focus, but once these devices become connected to a cellular network, expect unique applications and communications capabilities to become available. This will also solve another key issue: freeing the device from the smartphone, creating a standalone experience.”

    Its important to note here the scalability of wearables in a clinical setting requires Intention, Education and collaboration[7]. Some of the usecases highlighted for wearables in healthcare: 

    1. Managing Chronic Conditions of patients who might develop a secondary or tertiary complication because of a pre-existing condition (diabetic undergoing hip replacement surgery)
    2. Tracking vital signs
    3. Manage patients recovery at home (defensive medicine) instead of the recovery in a general ward, with help of remote monitoring
    4. Detecting Alzheimer’s, most common form of dementia
    5. Monitoring patients with chronic diseases and after hospitalization or the start of new medications for a decline in daily activity may help detect medical complications before rehospitalization becomes necessary
    6. Clinical Trials: Monitoring of recruits
    7. Smart Stethoscope for patients with cardiovascular disease
    8. Ear device to track body temperature fluctuations
    9. Temporary tattoo that senses vital signs
    10. Smart Glasses with AR enabled patient records and physician information system


    Finally, here is an interesting Infographic on Wearable Technology. 

    References

    1. Worldwide Wearables Market to Nearly Double by 2021, According to IDC: http://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS42818517
    2. Wearables Aren’t Dead, They’re Just Shifting Focus as the Market Grows 16.9% in the Fourth Quarter, According to IDC 

    3. Xiaomi and Apple Tie for the Top Position as the Wearables Market Swells 17.9% During the First Quarter, According to IDC: 

    4. EXCLUSIVE: Fitbit Working On Atrial Fibrillation Detection | Time.com http://time.com/4907284/fitbit-detect-atrial-fibrillation/
    5. The 8 Best Fitness Trackers You Can Buy Right Now: http://time.com/4553111/best-fitness-trackers-fitbit-jawbone-2016/
    6. Can Your Fitness Tracker (Fitbit®) Save Your Life in the ER?: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/can-your-fitness-tracker-fitbit-save-your-life-in-the-er-300246408.html
    7. Advocating for clinical wearables, the new normal in healthcare http://medcitynews.com/2017/08/advocating-clinical-wearables-new-normal-healthcare/?rf=1
    8. Global wearables market to grow 17% in 2017, 310M devices sold, $30.5BN revenue: Gartner: https://techcrunch.com/2017/08/24/global-wearables-market-to-grow-17-in-2017-310m-devices-sold-30-5bn-revenue-gartner/?ncid=rss
    9. What smartwatches and other wearables can’t track today— but might in the future – https://www.cnbc.com/2017/11/05/wearables-future-track-glucose-blood-pressure-mental-health.html

    Author

    [tab]
    [content title=”About Manish Sharma” icon=”fa-heart”]

    Manish Sharma

    Founder HCITExpert.com, Digital Health Entrepreneur

    Connect with me via any of my Social Media Channels

    [/content]
    [content title=”Latest Articles”]

    [/content] [/tab]

    #AI in Healthcare by @deveshrajadhyax


    There are some subjects that invoke sharp and contrasting emotions in the society. In present day India, the GST tops the list of such things that are considered boon by some and curse by others. New technology usually does this to people. The steam engine, the telephone and the computer all have been greeted both as the savior and the nemesis of the mankind. 


    Using Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare is one such subject. If you have to believe what the media says, AI is going to transform healthcare in the near future. In fact, the services of the doctor may not be needed very often, if at all. AI will do everything in medicine including diagnosis, treatment and even finding out new drugs.

    But not everyone is so optimistic or even welcoming. The idea of machines taking care of our health is creepy to some. Others claim that AI can never replace a doctor, at least not in a foreseeable future. Medicine is too complex for machines to figure out.

    (You must have noted that I am using Healthcare and Medicine interchangeably. The reason being that this is what most people do. Healthcare is the practice of medicine and as such is wider than it. I refer to healthcare as including medicine.)

    The reality, like in the case of GST and most other things, will be somewhere in the middle. The purpose of this article is to find that balanced view. In effect, what I will be saying is:

    “while the replacement of the doctor is a faraway dream, there are a number of things that AI can do in medicine even today. This can turn out to be valuable help for doctors, patients and other stakeholders”.


    Let me first present a short introduction to AI.

    AI, like Philosophy, is a very hard term to define. AI is not really one technology. It is a collection of techniques. Strictly speaking, AI is actually an ambition. The ambition of machines to imitate human capabilities.  
       
    But this definition does not take us very far. Since human capabilities are many, ranging from walking to writing poems, imitating any of these capabilities can be called AI. So for our purposes, we will define AI as the pursuit of those capabilities that are strong points of human beings.

    As an example, consider language. Reading an article and understanding its gist is a simple matter for us humans. For machines to achieve this capability will be quite something. If that happens, machines can go through a number of articles for us and feed us with the just the little bits that we need.

    A whole lot of mathematical and computational techniques have been developed by researchers in the last sixty years to achieve this goal. Deep Learning, Machine Learning and NLP are some names given to a bunch of such techniques. In the last few years, AI has risen to prominence mainly due to three reasons – availability of data, increase in computing power and discovery of new methods. 

    Armed with that introduction, let’s try and put down the areas where AI can make a difference in healthcare. While we do that, we can also try to answer the ‘replace the doctor’ question.

    Diagnosis: Diagnosis is the hardest part of medicine. There is no definite pathway to diagnosing a patient. A lot depends on the experience and intuition of the doctor, in that way, it is more of an art than science. As of now, it is difficult to see AI taking over this role. However, there are many areas where AI is already making a difference:

    • Conditions in which diagnosis is dependent on analysis of a signal over time, such as an ecg or an eeg. Machine Learning combined with signal processing can achieve good results here. Arrhythmia or irregular heartbeat is an example of such a condition that AI can detect well.
    • Diagnosing some disorders involves referring to a lot of data such as past and present reports, images and history. Gatro-intestinal disorders are notoriously difficult to diagnose and require a lot of information to refer. AI can make a big difference here by sifting through the pile of data and presenting important facts to the doctor.
    • In radiology, the volume of cases is huge and the radiologist needs to look at every image to come to a conclusion. Some investigations like MRI produce a large number of images for each patient. This makes the doctor’s time a bottleneck in handling the ever growing number of patients. Deep Learning has shown great promise in being able to classify medical images. For example, it can separate images that indicate normal functioning from those that have some abnormality. This will enable the radiologist to focus on the abnormal cases first. This method will also be a boon for the remote places where a radiologist is not available.
    • AI has provided a new method for laboratory investigations. This may mean that in the future most lab tests including pathology will be done with basic instruments at a very low cost. In a disease like HIV/AIDS, being able to determine the viral load in a quick and inexpensive way can be a very big benefit to the patients. 


    Treatment: The biggest contribution AI can make to treatment of patient is in the area of drug discovery. Currently, discovering a new drug costs more than 2.5 billion dollars and takes more than a decade. The pharmaceutical industry is desperately searching for new ways to reduce the cost and time. AI may be one of the solutions to this problem. Machine Learning and Deep Learning are being used in various stages of drug discovery, such as identifying candidate molecules and studying the expected response of the new drug.

    In our fight with cancer, AI may be an important weapon. Personalized Oncology is rapidly getting attention from the medical community as the way forward in battling with the cancer scourge. To describe in brief, cancer is not one disease – the cancer of every patient is different. If the individuality of cancer is decoded, a personal treatment path can be planned for every patient. AI will become a key part of this process.

    AI is already playing a role in treatment by making robots that perform surgeries. This contribution will grow in the time to come with the robot costs falling and capabilities growing. This will reduce the strain on surgeons and they will be able to perform far more surgeries in the same time. 

    Care: Care during the illness and recovery is as important as the right diagnosis and treatment. Along with IoT, AI will transform patient care. Everything from medicine intake to prescribed activity will be monitored by these systems. Monitoring includes two components – sensing and analysis. While the sensing part is done by the IoT devices, analysis is provided by AI. 

    Prevention: Prevention is definitely preferred to hospitalization and AI is going to play a major role in this. It will involve both personal and public health. Personal health is monitored by the wearables and other simple devices. The AI systems will process this data to look for possible indications of disorders so that they can be fixed inexpensively. 

    Public health will be monitored in the same way but from data that is coming from various healthcare institutes. This enormous data will forewarn us about various health risks such as outbreaks of diseases. It will enable the state to take measures to avoid the calamities.

    In short:
    To summarize, AI will really be a transformational technology for healthcare. It will make healthcare cheaper and faster and enable it to reach more number of people. AI will reduce the strain on doctors and nurses. However, for the future that we can see, AI will serve more as an assistant to the doctors, rather than being their replacement. 

    Author
    Devesh Rajadhyax

    Founder and CEO, Cere Labs, AI, Machine Learning, Deep Learning

    Four ways in which #AI can help humankind @deveshrajadhyax


    Artificial Intelligence is receiving more than its fair share of public attention. On one side there are promises of miracles, while on the other side there are warnings of doomsday. What is probably missing is a simple listing of clear benefits. This is article is an attempt to create such a list.


    Artificial Intelligence is more of an ambition than a technology. The ambition is to imitate human capabilities. Since human capabilities range from walking to solving mathematical problems, AI also encompasses systems of various types – ranging from the humble calculator to Google’s DeepMind.

    In this article, I am majorly referring to the AI systems that try to achieve the cognitive abilities of human beings. Cognitive abilities refer to the processes of our mind such as understanding, reasoning, planning and selecting the right action. Understanding a question and supplying the right answer from our memory is an example of cognitive ability, the one that AI systems called ‘chatbots’ try to imitate.

    Cognitive systems are currently in their initial phase of development. Once they come close to human beings in their competence, they can prove useful to humankind in a number of ways. Here are some:

    1. Better utilization of resources: In our current world, it requires a human being to use resources. For example, a car needs a driver. Platforms like Uber have made it possible to share your car when you don’t need it, but it still requires a skilled human being. Talk to your Ola or Uber driver and you will realize that they are already working at the limit of their capacity. A cognitive system driving vehicle will use them much more efficiently. You will actually need much fewer vehicles than you need today (and probably a lot lesser parking!). This is true of most other resources.

    2. A fairer society: Human beings have many faults in their thinking. In another article I have highlighted this faults, called biases. These biases have their roots in the evolution, so the AI systems will (hopefully) not have them. ( Pl see http://blog.cerelabs.com/2017/06/will-ai-evolve-to-be-as-bad-as-humans.html). This will make decision making at all level fairer for the people. To take an example, typecasting is a very strong bias that we suffer from. This affects decisions taken by, say an interviewer. We can hope to see much fairer selection processes in the future. For an interesting example of how statistics can help to break biased notions, see the movie or read the book ‘Moneyball’.

    3. Repositioning of human efforts: World over, a large number of people are engaged in time consuming tasks that require moderate cognitive ability. Take for instance cooking. A big part of a woman’s day in India is spent in preparing food. Cognitive systems such as robot chefs can easily take over these jobs, freeing up a lot of time that can be invested in more valuable responsibilities like education of the children. In the industries, as the simpler tasks are done by cognitive systems, humans can move up the value chain, pushing the efficiency of the enterprise higher.

    4. Improved care: Currently, care of patients, elderly and disabled is primarily a human responsibility. Many times, this compromises the quality of care as people cannot take out so much time from their daily activities. Cognitive systems can make the life of those in need of care much better. They can talk to the elderly and carry the disabled to places otherwise difficult to reach. The systems can keep an eye on chronic patients, not just reminding but making sure their regimen is adhered to.

    This is of course just a small contribution to an ever growing list of benefits. While we keep our eyes open to the warnings given by the likes of Stephen Hawking and Elon Musk, we should continue in our efforts to harness the power of AI for these benefits.

    Author
    Devesh Rajadhyax

    Founder and CEO, Cere Labs, AI, Machine Learning, Deep Learning

    Philips Digital Healthcare Conclave 2017 #ConnectedCare In Focus by Sagay Mary, @hisagay


    What if expensive, specialized patient monitoring systems in ICUs could be replaced with discreet sensors that transmitted all the vital health data directly to the doctors’ smartphones? What if the data could be analysed to deliver intelligible insights as well? Not only would it ensure better quality of care, it would also help bring down equipment and overhead costs for the hospital by eliminating expensive equipment and by even allowing patients to be cared for at home. The good news is that, this is not a hypothetical scenario but a real possibility as technology makes connected healthcare a reality.


    The 2017 edition of the Philips Healthcare Conclave held on 28th July 2017 addressed the confluence of technology and healthcare and its significant impact on patient care, accessibility, and affordability. The conference shed light on why Connected Healthcare is the need of the hour for our country and how it can solve the existing healthcare problems. The conference was graced by the presence of industry stalwarts like Dr. Shalini Rajneesh, Principal Secretary Family and Health Welfare, Government of Karnataka and Dr. Pramod K. Varma, Chief Architect, Aadhaar. The speakers discussed how Connected Care and AI supported by UIDAI (Aadhaar) could help in addressing the challenges faced by the Indian Healthcare System. 

    The discussion also highlighted The National Healthcare Policy 2017, which talks about how Connected Healthcare is the solution to the existing healthcare problems in India. The policy suggests the setting up of a National Digital Health Authority (NDHA) to regulate, develop and deploy digital health across the continuum of care using digital technologies. It highlights the role of Aadhaar to make connected healthcare a reality by establishing a seamless and efficient National Health Information Network. The panel also discussed how Philips has been at the forefront of using digital technology in healthcare. Its various connected care solutions have increased accessibility to care in remotest corners of the world, empowered patients to manage their health while also giving health providers tools to improve patient outcomes. With a mission to touch more than 3 billion lives by 2025, Philips is working towards creating meaningful innovations that will make Healthcare accessible to all.

    Affordability, accessibility and the over-all ecosystem were in sharp focus through all the discussions during the day. All the speakers emphasized that a comprehensive overhaul of existing healthcare frameworks cannot happen in isolation; it requires a supportive ecosystem to be sustainable and scalable. The ecosystem ranges from primary health care centers and doctors to healthcare technology companies and start-ups. Most importantly, in a Connected Healthcare scenario, Internet networks and seamless connectivity are just as important as any directly medical element. The speakers almost unanimously agreed that a connected healthcare system in India needs both the private and public sectors to work in tandem.

    The conference saw industry thought leaders emphasizing the current state of readiness for implementing connected care systems in India, as well the areas that need attention. Technology stacks like Aadhar are already in place, ready for both public and private enterprises to build comprehensive healthcare solutions on. At this juncture, it is important to focus on developing and empowering the macro ecosystem to work with digital systems. From education and awareness programs to data security protocols and legal frameworks, both government as well as the private sector needs to work together to ensure a robust and workable system.

     As with any major technology disruption, people are at the crux of the move to Connected Healthcare systems. The speakers stressed the fact that doctors will remain relevant even in the future tech enabled state of healthcare, and be empowered to better diagnose and treat their patients with the use of technology. The conference also highlighted the fact that ultimately, digital healthcare systems will go a long way in reducing costs. Currently, Karnataka alone spends more than Rs. 6000 crores to extend healthcare services to just 5 percent of its total population. Connected Healthcare systems have the potential to guarantee universal access to quality healthcare with seamless links between hospitals and people.  

    Affordability, accessibility and adoption were hot topics within the healthcare sector even about 30 years ago. While they still remain in focus three decades later, now for the first time, there is a strong glimmer of hope, as technology makes it easier to find answers to these challenges. As the experts at the conclave pointed out, the world has just scratched the surface of Connected Healthcare, the possibilities are endless and future looks bright. 

    Author
    Sagay Mary

    Manager, Corporate Communications at Philips, Bangalore responsible for branding and communications

    #VR #AR can increase efficiency and reduce cost in medical education #meded by Dr. Vikram @drvikram

    Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality has the potential to transform key areas in healthcare. Medical Education, Rehabilitation, supply chain the list is endless and what is limiting us is our own imagination.

    Last week I was speaking at the IT Healthcare Summit on the potential for VR/AR to transform healthcare. I also shared my views on this post before the conference. In my discussions with the delegates, I realized that the foundation of medical education in India can be improved drastically. One just needs to look around medical colleges in India to understand the state of the dissection halls there. 


    Often, they suffer from the lack of cadavers so essential for understanding key aspects of human anatomy. This leads to a weakness in fully grasping aspects of human anatomy that would help them become better doctors and improve care outcomes. A light-hearted representation of this was seen in the movie “Munna Bhai MBBS”. Often the students must share a single cadaver and this does not help the students at all. But VR/AR can change that.

    A pilot at Miami Children’s Hospital saw that the retention in students who were taught through AR/VR was 80% as compared to 20% for those who were taught through traditional methods. In India SRM University in Chennai and Global Hospitals in Hyderabad have been piloting AR/VR 

    Another area where AR/VR played a critical role was in training surgeons and physicians on complex procedures like “Tracheal Intubation”. Tracheal intubation, usually simply referred to as intubation, is the placement of a flexible plastic tube into the trachea (windpipe) to maintain an open airway or to serve as a conduit through which to administer certain drugs. It is frequently performed in critically injured, ill, or anesthetized patients to facilitate ventilation of the lungs, including mechanical ventilation, and to prevent the possibility of asphyxiation or airway obstruction. (Source: Wikipedia)

    A major hospital chain increased the efficiency of their surgeons by 35% by using simulation of tracheal Intubation using VR/AR vs a specialized training that would have required them to travel to a special center. The cost savings were more to the tune of 500% using this method.

    But the major effect of AR/VR would be in rehabilitation. Already pilots have been conducted in areas like PTSD by the US Army. The Indian Spinal Research Institute is already using VR/AR technology to use it in the physio therapy process for rehabilitation post-surgery.

    The potential is immense and the use cases are still building up. But what’s stopping us ? Well I look forward to your comments and suggestions to get us moving in this direction. Looking forward to your views and suggestions on the same. 

    Author

    [tab]
    [content title=”About Dr. Vikram Venkateswaran”]

    Dr. Vikram Venkateswaran

    Dr Vikram Venkateswaran is a healthcare thought leader who writes and speaks about the emerging healthcare models in India and the role technology plays in them.
    Connect with me

    [/content]
    [content title=”Latest Articles”]

    [/content] [/tab]

    Internet of Things #IoT : Healthcare & Medical by @vsolank1

    Application of “IoT”, the latest buzz word as many would like to call it, are numerous and have been covered under the topics below

















    Healthcare industry is one the largest in any country both in terms of the required reach to the masses and in terms of per capita budget. Human beings save money to live comfortably, to get their child married, to buy a house and last but not the least to pay for medical bills. As per the latest reports on USA health stats only 21 out of 100 people (< 65 age) have medical coverage. But the spend on prescription drugs is rapidly increasing from 2004 ($192 B) to 2014 ($297) however maximum of this spend is funded by private savings. Scenario is not much different in other developed countries.















    On the other end if we look at developing countries like India, then as per WHO the top 10 reason of deaths in India includes heart diseases, obstructive pulmonary, stroke and so on.
















    Other emerging and under developed nations will have similar stats or even worse. So why do I think IoT based solutions can improve these stats in a positive way? Let’s see some of the health and medical related IoT apps, devices, solutions and monitoring systems that can have a cost effective impact on these issues. Additionally I think if Government increase its spend on R&D it can immensely help to make the solutions more scalable and deployable.

    Proactive Health Solutions

    Yolo Health ATM is an integrated health screening kiosk with integrated medical devices such as Glucometer, BP monitor, BMI calculator, etc, and also staffed by a medical attendant. This can be next generation kiosk that will help people, short on time, to be more proactive about their health. This also holds potential to be deployed in rural areas where primary healthcare penetration is limited. Wearables such as FitBit, Apple Watch and various health bands are not new to us and they help a great deal in tracking your activities in real time.

    Remote Patient Monitoring

    Healthcare providers and family members always wish to monitor the health of the patient in real time. Pre and Post operative measures are taken to monitor patients health and IoT can enable solution that can allow to achieve this more efficiently and economically. Real time information, published through cloud, will help caregivers to make informed decisions and diagnosis, which are more evidence based. In the current world it is a mixture of symptoms, patients reactions and doctors gut feel which sometimes leads to trial and error diagnosis. IoT can provide real time data and more accurate information at the right time, which can revolutionize the healthcare market. This will also help in preventive disease management, reduced health care cost, enhanced patient experience, reduced errors and shorter recovery cycle.

    Drugs Management

    From the point of improving process on the manufacturing and R&D facilities using sensor based proactive maintenance systems and real time information feeding pipes to improving the tracking of drugs from the point of distribution to the point of purchase – IoT has a big role to play. While I won’t go deep as they are not directly healthcare related but I would like to mention – supply chain management, fleet management, asset tracking, temperature and humidity monitoring and inventory management are all the categories of solutions that can help in this area.


    Forbes article talks about partnership between Qualcomm and Philips to focus on creating healthcare IoT solutions such as connected dispensers for medicines, biological sensors, self care glucose meters for diabetics to an integrated cloud system for health record monitoring. Connected Medical Equipment which can transmit the data captured through sensors and of course from the patient directly onto the cloud for transparency and monitoring purpose as described here is a very handy use case for IoT.

    Personal Health Data Security

    However the concern many of us is security and safety of that sensitive private data about my health to be lost, hacked, misused by anyone. What if the data is captured and used for targeting ads at me? I think this is fine because it will only SPAM my life but not endanger it. Healthcare IoT Security Risk is a worth short article to read. LinkLabs also talks some of these use cases and concerns nicely.

    #IoT, #M2M, #Healthcare, #Medicine, #Wearable, #Remote Patient Monitoring

    Author
    Vinay Solanki

    Vinay has 10+ years of experience in Internet of Things(IoT), WiFi as a Service, Mobile money, Global projects and team management, client engagement, and consulting.

    Currently he leads IoT and WiFi business for Bharti Airtel, aggressively driving business opportunities in this space. Prior to this he was the Global Head for revenue assurance and fraud management for Airtel Money (a mobile wallet) managing 17 countries in Africa and pan-India, focusing on building comprehensive financial risk picture for Airtel Money.