IoT IN HEALTHCARE

Healthcare #IoT, what the future holds by Arnab Paul, @iArnabPaul

Things in healthcare, its popularity is undeniably on the rise in other industries


The world is continuously growing and changing. Various advancements have also occurred when it comes to the technology used in rendering healthcare services. Thus, there is no doubt that the healthcare industry has improved in the last decade but what are some of those improvements.  

The technology has also played a big role in patient registration and data monitoring. Before, people need to go seek a doctor and visit them personally for a consultation but now, it is very much possible for them to consult a doctor in the convenience of their own homes by allowing them to talk with their doctor through a video chat, as Telehealth has been introduced. 

Apart from that, there are also technologies that allow a healthcare provider to monitor their patients in their own mobile phones. It’s not only that for they are also now capable of sending and receiving patient’s information in their mobile phones as well. All of these have been made possible, as wireless connectivity exists. 

Devices that can help monitor one’s health of the one wearing it have also been highly available in the market.  As a matter of fact, there are even sensors that are capable of collecting data that would of course help their doctor be informed in case there is something abnormal with their patients. This allows them to provide the right medication and treatment to their patients fast. On the other hand, although great improvements have been made in the healthcare industry, one can still expect that a brighter future awaits in the next years or decades.  

Within five years, the majority of clinically relevant data will be collected outside of clinical settings. It has been said that healthcare in the future would become more personal. Thus, one can expect that personalized medicines or medicines that have been created specifically for an individual would be available. The way doctors diagnoses their patient’s disease and provides treatment to them would also be changed as data would become more accessible in the future, combined with the use of more hi-tech devices. As more people are being conscious of their health, one can expect that more tools and equipment would be available in the future.

Internet of Things

in the IoT paradigm everything in the world is considered as a smart object, and allows them to communicate each other through the internet technologies by physically or virtually. IoT allows people and things to be connected Anytime, Anyplace, with anything and anyone, by using ideally in any path/network and any service.Internet of Things could be the driver for health care’s new visage and revolutionize patient care transcendentally. Few ways how IoT can be used in healthcare industry  

1) Remote patient monitoring

Remote patient monitoring (RPM) uses digital technologies to collect medical and other forms of health data from one individual in one location and electronically transmit this information to the health care providers. RPM can help reduce the number of hospital readmissions and lengths of stay in the hospitals. 

2) Clinical care

Hospitalised patients whose physiological status requires close attention can be constantly monitored using IoT driven, non-invasive monitoring. Sensors are used to collect such information and using cloud to analyse data and then send this analysed data to caregivers. It replaces the need for the doctor to visit the patient during regular intervals for check up. This will also help to improve the quality of care through constant monitoring.

3) Device monitoring

An IoT connected device metal device can notify when there is a problem with a device.  This will prevent the device from shutting down and avoid patient rescheduling.

4) Outpatient Monitoring

This IoT solution enables doctors to capture health parameters and advice patients remotely. The patient’s hospital visit is therefore limited and needs to visit only on need basis. This solution helps hospitals manage hospital beds and consequently increase revenues while at the same time delighting customers.  

Although, IoT implementations will likely raise concerns around data privacy and security. While most of today’s devices use secure methods to communication information to the cloud, they could still be vulnerable to hackers. 

While we have yet to see a huge number of adopters of the Internet of Things in healthcare, its popularity is undeniably on the rise in other industries.

The article was first published in Mr. Arnab Paul’s LinkedIn Pulse post. The article is reproduced here with the authors permission. 

Author

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Arnab Paul, CEO, Patient Planet

Globally-minded systems thinker, action-oriented and inspired toward optimizing health outcomes through innovation, creativity, cooperation. Passionate about facilitating the alignment among technology, people and processes to ultimately improve patient experience and the functioning of healthcare.

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Can the Internet of Things #IoT transform Healthcare? by @drvikram


Internet of things continues to dominate the world apparent by the success of the Liveworx16 that recently concluded in Boston. Liveworx is the signature event of Thingworx a PTC company. The event saw a curious mix of CAD/CAM experts who were trying to understand how IoT was going to help them mingling with IoT experts who had already implemented a few projects and were looking to consolidate on their early mover advantage. But one Industry that is looking at IoT very seriously is healthcare. Yes you heard me its healthcare, and may even leapfrog other industries when it comes to IoT adoption.


But then why should healthcare look at IoT?


Well that is a good question that is being asked by many hospitals and rightfully so. Hospitals have a duty towards their patients, community, physicians and staff and the last thing they want to do is to embark on a new technology for the sake of technology. But before we look at why IoT, we should probably try to understand the origin of IoT.


Some might argue that IoT is not new, maybe the patenting of the passive RFID in 1973 was the origin of IoT. By the 1980’s many manufacturing units were already connected. Some others like consumer goods were using a form of IoT. For example Coke was using a similar technology with its vending machines in 1980’s which was invented at the Carnegie Mellon University. 1980 was also the year CERN launched World Wide Web (WWW) and the internet was born. By 1990’s Wal-Mart had mandated all organizations that are displaying their goods to have advanced RFID chips. This had led to the famous spat between P & G and Wal-Mart. I am not sure who blinked first but for a while P & G was off the shelves at Wal-Mart.

By 2000’s we started connecting devices to the internet. Power grids and Energy companies started systems which were talking to each other. Soon cell phones were connected and then by 2008, we saw the inflection point on the number of connected devices. Today we have wearable devices that can send your physiological data to your physician that can help him or her track your health parameters like BP and sugar levels.

IoT in India is not new either. I know for example a hospital in Delhi-NCR region had ambulances with antennas on its top, ECG machines, and monitors along with physicians in the ambulance. This way despite the traffic jams in India, the critical records of the patients would arrive at the ER and the physicians and surgeons would make the necessary preparation for stabilizing the patient and save valuable time that otherwise they would have wasted in these tests. At that time Rajesh Batra who was head of technology, was able to make this work and get the physicians and management on board by demonstrating the value of IoT in an ambulatory set up.

“IoT has the potential to improve care” says Rajesh Batra , “But we need to be careful about security as it very easy for a breach which would be dangerous for a hospital”

He continues the same zeal in Kokilaben Hospital in Mumbai where he currently is the CIO. He is also looking at integrating IoT with emerging areas like Omni Channel with iBeacons to give a truly connected experience at the hospital.

As I have written many times in the past, we in India have this unique opportunity to create a new healthcare model that can help 1.3 billion people manage their health. I think an important component of that is population health.

Now a hypothetical population health program could work on the principle of a hospital enrolling a set of patients who need chronic care, let’s say for example diabetes into a program. The program entails these patients to check their sugar levels regularly and through IoT their sugar levels get updated into a program dash board that the physician can see. If the sugar levels are within the parameter then there is no incident. But if the sugar levels rise or fall outside of the normal range. Then the system alerts the physician. The physician would check if this is one off case or is there is a regular pattern. Based on this he or she can intervene and schedule a checkup and enter the same in the record.

Now this is a simple example, but helps us to understand how a potential IoT solution could work in population health. It would not only help in tackling chronic diseases in India, but could serve as the only option in tier 2 and tier 3 cities where access to hospitals is not available. Having said all that IoT will definitely shape the future of healthcare in the country, the only thing to be seen is the extent of that transformation.

The article was first published on Dr. Vikram’s Blog, it is reproduced here with the authors permission
Author
Dr Vikram Venkateswaran

Dr Vikram Venkateswaran is a healthcare thought leader who writes and speaks about the emerging healthcare models in India and the role technology plays in them.

#infographic: IoT in Healthcare, Types of Opportunities

Infographic: IoT in Healthcare: Types of Opportunities

To develop an IoT based solution like TRIVENI, it is important to understand the market opportunity. In this infographic we leverage information from various reports that define the market opportunity that allow for the development and investment in such a solution

We present the total economic impact of IoT in the Healthcare Industry as also the types of opportunities that can be explored by Healthcare Technology vendors

Author

Team HCITExperts

Your partner in Digital Health Transformation using innovative and insightful ideas

Suggested Reading

  1. Why Integration is Critical to Success in IoT implementations – Smarter With Gartner http://ow.ly/HBxF300BwYI
  2. is not one size fits all
  3. Internet of Things for Healthcare May be Worth $410B by 2022 http://bit.ly/1RpbwMq  
  4.  A Must-Read Overview of the Medical Device Industry – Market Realist http://ow.ly/EjF8300yD9A   
  5. Plug And Play Middleware Integration Solutions Gain In Popularity While Interoperability Stymies Healthcare http://bit.ly/1RjlX3R

More INFOGRAPHICS by TEAM HCITExpert

  1. 7 Types of Cyber Threats
  2. Healthcare Cyber breaches by numbers – Mar 2016

New Healthcare Aggregators: SMAC and IoT via @pankajguptadr

Author: Dr. Pankaj Gupta

Digital Health Influencer & SMAC / IoT Speaker
15.Feb.2016, India


The old paradigm of business as a linear value chain is now facing extinction. Businesses are now ecologies and not merely producers and sellers ! That requires a change in thinking. Customer Relationship Management (CRM) needs to be a mission at every step of the process. This is hard to overemphasize! The internet is clearly the medium that allows such integration across time and space. It is time to take a more accepting look at Cloud and Social Media technologies. This offers the only universal layer of engagement across stakeholders. The investment in IT hardware as we new it in the past has been greatly optimized by mobile. It has brought a tactile feel to life and work for all of us. Mobile mirrors the nature of Healthcare in terms of immediacy and continuity so well. Healthcare needs to embrace it wholeheartedly. Healthcare can only profit from it.

There is a huge Vacuum in Indian Healthcare-IT space. Large Healthcare-IT vendors have exited the market. Either they lost interest and exited or got bought out e.g. TrakHealth, iSoft. Also the market is moving from client-server to cloud and from Capex to Opex models. New cloud based players are small in size and yet to reach enterprise class. Existing players are not able to shift out to cloud because of their long term negotiated contracts in client-server model. The time is now when full conversion of Enterprise class to SMAC will happen anyways. Healthcare CIOs can keep eyes closed or tighten the belt and ride the Digital wave.

Recently I spoke to a Director of State NHM in India. He said we are doing HMIS and Public health through ANM/ASHA. How do we benefit from SMAC IoT platform? Hard for many to imagine SMAC is a unifying force across enterprises and IoT breaks the silos. This can be quite unnerving for many. 

The era of hierarchical command and control is over. Now is the time for horizontal networking across Communities of Practice [CoP]. Whatever gets the maximum likes becomes the In Thing. Whatever is the In Thing gets used the maximum. Students are learning more from the online networking than from the formal classroom and professors. Research will reach the point of use as soon as it gets published. Primary care Providers in semi-urban and rural areas will have access to latest therapeutic recommendations. The old Adage that ‘Knowledge is the only form of power that is not expendable but grows when shared’ has become true.  

The movie Avatar has beautifully depicted the concept of Small data ^ = Big Data where small knowledge base of each living being [App] is contributing towards the collective consciousness [Big Data] of Eywa. Now the question is will the future of SMAC/IoT be driven by technology or biotechnology?

Anyways for now – The time has come when you don’t need big monolithic HIS software to run hospitals. Now you can do everything with small mobile based Apps for every function. Though I am already seeing many of these Apps in the market but what is lacking is a unified platform on which the Apps should be built such that the data can be seamlessly collated. Also it gives the provider the flexibility to select from a bouquet of Apps. 

IoT integration platforms are emerging that will integrate at the App level, Data level and Semantic level. Anyone in the ecosystem can slice, dice, run reports on the collated data.

Successful Cloud models have dug the grave for the Enterprise Hardware. Capex has got converted to Opex. Now you can pay for the software on the cloud like you pay your monthly electricity bill.

SMAC coupled with IoT has a potential to bring the Aggregator Business model to Healthcare. Soon the unorganised and fragmented primary care, secondary care and supporting care market will begin to get Aggregated. I see these Aggregators becoming larger than established capital intensive Enterprise market similar to what happened in the Automobile market. It will be in the interest of Insurance, Pharma and Govt to go all out and support this emerging SMAC/IoT driven Healthcare Market Aggregation.    

References

Why Healthcare must Re-imagine itself – and how
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/why-healthcare-must-re-imagine-itself-how-arun-kumbhat
Why All Indian Hospitals IT is in Bad Shape
http://healthcareitstrategy.blogspot.in/2014/04/why-all-indian-hospitals-it-is-in-bad.html
Global HIS/EMR vendor nightmare outside US
http://healthcareitstrategy.blogspot.in/2012/08/global-hisemr-vendor-nightmare-outside.html
Thick client vs Thin client
http://healthcareitstrategy.blogspot.in/2008/08/thick-client-vs-thin-client.html
There is no Market for EMR in India
http://healthcareitstrategy.blogspot.in/2012/10/there-is-no-market-for-emr-in-india.html
Size of Healthcare-IT Market in India
http://healthcareitstrategy.blogspot.in/2012/06/size-of-healthcare-it-market-in-india.html 

Please note: The Author of this article is Dr. Pankaj Gupta. The article was first published on Dr. Gupta’s blog. And also on Dr. Gupta’s LinkedIn profile :New Healthcare Aggregators: SMAC and IoT | Dr Pankaj Gupta | LinkedIn

Article By: Dr. Pankaj Gupta

Digital Health Influencer & SMAC / IoT Speaker | Healthcare Business Executive, Chief Medical Informatics Officer at ProMed Network AG | Managing Partner at TAURUS GLOCAL CONSULTING | Director at Taurus Globalsourcing Inc.
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