IoT

Internet of Things #IoT : Healthcare & Medical by @vsolank1

Application of “IoT”, the latest buzz word as many would like to call it, are numerous and have been covered under the topics below

















Healthcare industry is one the largest in any country both in terms of the required reach to the masses and in terms of per capita budget. Human beings save money to live comfortably, to get their child married, to buy a house and last but not the least to pay for medical bills. As per the latest reports on USA health stats only 21 out of 100 people (< 65 age) have medical coverage. But the spend on prescription drugs is rapidly increasing from 2004 ($192 B) to 2014 ($297) however maximum of this spend is funded by private savings. Scenario is not much different in other developed countries.















On the other end if we look at developing countries like India, then as per WHO the top 10 reason of deaths in India includes heart diseases, obstructive pulmonary, stroke and so on.
















Other emerging and under developed nations will have similar stats or even worse. So why do I think IoT based solutions can improve these stats in a positive way? Let’s see some of the health and medical related IoT apps, devices, solutions and monitoring systems that can have a cost effective impact on these issues. Additionally I think if Government increase its spend on R&D it can immensely help to make the solutions more scalable and deployable.

Proactive Health Solutions

Yolo Health ATM is an integrated health screening kiosk with integrated medical devices such as Glucometer, BP monitor, BMI calculator, etc, and also staffed by a medical attendant. This can be next generation kiosk that will help people, short on time, to be more proactive about their health. This also holds potential to be deployed in rural areas where primary healthcare penetration is limited. Wearables such as FitBit, Apple Watch and various health bands are not new to us and they help a great deal in tracking your activities in real time.

Remote Patient Monitoring

Healthcare providers and family members always wish to monitor the health of the patient in real time. Pre and Post operative measures are taken to monitor patients health and IoT can enable solution that can allow to achieve this more efficiently and economically. Real time information, published through cloud, will help caregivers to make informed decisions and diagnosis, which are more evidence based. In the current world it is a mixture of symptoms, patients reactions and doctors gut feel which sometimes leads to trial and error diagnosis. IoT can provide real time data and more accurate information at the right time, which can revolutionize the healthcare market. This will also help in preventive disease management, reduced health care cost, enhanced patient experience, reduced errors and shorter recovery cycle.

Drugs Management

From the point of improving process on the manufacturing and R&D facilities using sensor based proactive maintenance systems and real time information feeding pipes to improving the tracking of drugs from the point of distribution to the point of purchase – IoT has a big role to play. While I won’t go deep as they are not directly healthcare related but I would like to mention – supply chain management, fleet management, asset tracking, temperature and humidity monitoring and inventory management are all the categories of solutions that can help in this area.


Forbes article talks about partnership between Qualcomm and Philips to focus on creating healthcare IoT solutions such as connected dispensers for medicines, biological sensors, self care glucose meters for diabetics to an integrated cloud system for health record monitoring. Connected Medical Equipment which can transmit the data captured through sensors and of course from the patient directly onto the cloud for transparency and monitoring purpose as described here is a very handy use case for IoT.

Personal Health Data Security

However the concern many of us is security and safety of that sensitive private data about my health to be lost, hacked, misused by anyone. What if the data is captured and used for targeting ads at me? I think this is fine because it will only SPAM my life but not endanger it. Healthcare IoT Security Risk is a worth short article to read. LinkLabs also talks some of these use cases and concerns nicely.

#IoT, #M2M, #Healthcare, #Medicine, #Wearable, #Remote Patient Monitoring

Author
Vinay Solanki

Vinay has 10+ years of experience in Internet of Things(IoT), WiFi as a Service, Mobile money, Global projects and team management, client engagement, and consulting.

Currently he leads IoT and WiFi business for Bharti Airtel, aggressively driving business opportunities in this space. Prior to this he was the Global Head for revenue assurance and fraud management for Airtel Money (a mobile wallet) managing 17 countries in Africa and pan-India, focusing on building comprehensive financial risk picture for Airtel Money.

Continuous Glucose Monitoring Made Affordable and Accessible by Piyush Gupta @Ambrosia_Sys

Living with diabetes comes with many challenges. At the top of the list is monitoring glucose levels to avoid a health crisis. Monitoring can be inconvenient and expensive, but thanks to advances in technology, these issues are being addressed like never before.


Dealing With Diabetes
Diabetes relates to the body’s ability to produce and process the hormone insulin. Without it, cells cannot absorb sugar, or glucose, which we need for energy.


Diabetics are typically diagnosed with one of two types of the disease: Type 1 or Type 2. Type 1 is when the body produces no insulin. The immune system destroys the cells that release it. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body is not producing enough insulin, or the levels produced are not sufficient to help the body generate energy.

In either case, the person diagnosed must make lifestyle changes to ensure glucose levels are kept in check. According to the American Diabetes Association, individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes should work out at least 2 hours/wk spread over 3 days/wk with no more than 2 consecutive days without exercise. The ADA also recommends nutritional counselling to address eating patterns, including lowering carbohydrates, fat intake and adding fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy to your diet. Of course, there is no one-size-fits-all program, and it’s important to consult your doctor to determine the dietary, exercise and behavioural changes that are best for you.

By The Numbers

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 29.1 million people or 9.3% of the US population has diabetes. Type 2 diabetes accounts for the largest group of people who have diabetes.

Another 86 million have been diagnosed as being pre-diabetic.

Globally, according to a 2016 report by the World Health Association, an estimated 422 million adults were living with diabetes in 2014, compared to 108 million in 1980. In fact, the global prevalence of diabetes has nearly doubled since 1980, rising from 4.7% to 8.5% in the adult population. Diabetes is on the rise not only in the United States but also around the world, and the complications from diabetes are impacting individuals and their families.

Behind these numbers are people coming to terms with the emotional and physical realities of managing their disease. We mentioned the importance of activity and exercise as well as healthy eating habits. Stress is also an important considering when managing diabetes. Learning to live with diabetes can weigh down the strongest amongst us and that stress can raise your blood sugar. Learning ways to lower stress, from yoga and deep breathing to gardening and listening to your favourite music, can keep your mind in a healthy state. 

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases recommends acquainting yourself with the ABCs: your A1C, Blood Pressure, and Cholesterol. Considering your ABCs can help lower your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes problems. When it comes to your blood pressure, monitoring it is a necessary addition to your daily routine. The key to the lifestyle changes diabetics undergo is having options to monitor glucose levels that are both effective, and affordable.

Technology Makes Monitoring Easier

Active management and monitoring of glucose is neither convenient nor cost effective for many. Some medical professionals recommend up to 10 tests per day. Assuming you have the schedule and discipline to stick with it, most diabetics have had to resort to testing their glucose levels through frequent, invasive needle pricks on their fingers.

There are saliva-testing devices under review by the US Food and Drug Administration, and Google was rumoured to be testing smart contact lenses that could monitor glucose levels as well. But a finger sticks remains the most common test despite the pain of a prick, the need to record readings and do so multiple times per day.

More convenient and accurate methods of testing glucose levels are becoming more readily available. For example, Abbott Laboratories invented the FreeStyle Libre system.

The device has been hailed for its convenience. Placed just under the skin, the sensor continuously measures glucose levels in the interstitial fluid that bathes the cells. Those wearing the device can use their smartphones to get immediate readings. According to Bloomberg, FreeStyle Libre users scanned their sensors an average 16 times a day; some exceeded 45.

While the repeated checks help diabetics lower their glucose levels, Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) systems are costly. Prices can range between $3,000 and $4,000/year, limiting the accessibility of life-saving monitoring. However, companies like Ambrosia Systems are reinventing the wheel, bringing cost savings and convenience to glucose monitoring.

Introducing BluCon
We invented BluCon to build an affordable next generation continuous glucose monitoring like system for diabetic and pre-diabetic patients. Our iOS and Android apps work with Abbot’s FreeStyle Libre sensor, sending glucose readings to any Bluetooth enabled connected device.

Today, two factors prohibit active monitoring and management of diabetes: cost and inconvenience. BluCon quickly reads data from Abbott’s FreeStyle Libre sensor and sends that data to the LinkBluCon mobile app on your phone for less than half the annual cost of available solutions. Our battery life is also twice as long, adding to the convenience and cost savings brought by BluCon.

Living with diabetes entails constant glucose monitoring, which, as we noted, can mean significant lifestyle changes. Checking glucose levels, and keeping an accurate record, can be complicated. BluCon is meant to simplify glucose monitoring and ongoing management of your type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Author
Piyush Gupta

Several years experience in product management worked at Abbott Diabetes Care, Kaiser Permanente, Capital One Bank and a couple of healthcare startups as senior product management executive. Helped companies in building next generation platform, iOS and android mobile products

Blog Series: #IoT in Healthcare by Swetha Jegannathan @csweths


The opportunity in #healthcare IoT is estimated to be $2.5 trillion by 2025. How are we embracing this change? The Types of Opportunities (http://blog.hcitexpert.com/2016/05/infographic-iot-in-healthcare-opportunities.html) that present themselves to the Startups, Healthcare IT organisations are tremendous.
Presenting the insights shared by Swetha Jegannathan (@csweths) on #IoT in Healthcare #PhilipsChat.
Q1: In the near term (1-3 years), What are the top 3 innovations in IoT that can benefit healthcare?:
Swetha Jegannathan:
1. Geriatric Care – IoT is and will continue to be of great value in elderly care, allowing the doctors and care givers to monitor, track and alert when away from their loved ones – especially in cases of neurological disorders like Dementia and Alzheimer.
2. Maternal and Infant Monitoring – IoT, through monitoring devices worn by the individual, can provide timely intervention in the area of maternal and infant health – one of the primary goals of the UN sustainable development agenda.
3. Remote consulting – The low doctor patient ratio in India can be effectively overcome through remote consulting – making patients responsible for their well-being – leading to the doctors and hospitals prioritise focus on emergency and chronic patients.

Note: Since radio frequency is central to most of the IoT innovations, innovator must adhere to protection standards on effects of radio frequency (RF) fields as tabulated by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP, 1998) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE, 2005)

Further the paper “IEEE Standard for Safety Levels with Respect to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz” also gives few pointers on safe use of the IOT technology. http://emfguide.itu.int/pdfs/C95.1-2005.pdf
Q2: Is an IoT based system going to be a utility or a service?:
Swetha Jegannathan: The system will be successful if offered as a service. Hospitals would be the drivers providing this service to their patients with companies engaged in the manufacture and distribution of medical devices being the enablers of the technology.
Q3. Do you see any device, connected via any protocol and with any cloud; as the future, if yes how will that be achieved? Standards?:
Swetha Jegannathan: RFID based devices connected through the anti-collision protocols and the Apple watch will be the future.

The RFID chips are inserted into the human beings for unique identification and capture of information relating to their general health and well being like blood pressure, weight, blood sugar levels.  The RFID tags can also be used for improving the efficiency of the medicine distribution networks as tracking of the medicines becomes easier.

Prevention of inappropriate usage of the collected information in terms of charging higher insurance premiums or classification of the individuals tracked by the device is one of the biggest challenges to its widespread implementation. However, if used judiciously, healthcare can certainly move from curative to preventive care.

RFID standards need to focus on the following:
– How the RFID systems work
– What frequencies do they operate on and how to use a common frequency across the globe
– Method of data transfer
– Communication between reader and the tags
– Complementary products development compatible to the RFID
 
Q4: In India (or your country), what are the Digital Infrastructure requirements for enabling IoT based Innovations in Healthcare?:
Swetha Jegannathan: In India, most of the patient data is available in physical form and this needs to be converted to electronic form.  Only if 100% of the required data is in electronic form, further analysis can be simplified.
For all the required data to be available electronically and their analysis, high end scanners, significant investment in hardware – to cater to large databases – and software (machine learning – image recognition; AI) to effectively manage data and make decisions. Further, a standard medical data code for data transmission and retrieval is a prerequisite.
Once the data is collected, stored and retrieved efficiently, analysis is accurate and easier leading to appropriate decision making.
Q5. How can hospitals leverage #IoT based solutions for service delivery and patient care? :
Swetha Jegannathan: Some usage of IOT in the indian and international hospitals are given below:
GE used sensors in a New York hospital to track the usage of hospital beds resulting in  optimised occupancy levels and reduced the emergency room wait times by four hours.
e-Alert, a HW/SW solution by Philips Healthcare, virtually monitors the health of its machines to prevent outages. Timely alerts on the wear and tear of the machines leads to savings on replacements and repair.
In India, Manipal Hospitals has been using a wearable device for the expecting mothers to enable doctors to remotely monitor real time information of the growing foetus.
Apollo hospitals has been an early adaptor of IoT in the country in healthcare for accessing patient records at one go with its Unique Hospital Identification initiative across the country.
In addition to the above, the hospitals can leverage IOT in the following areas:
– Clinical decision enablers
– Effective control on hospital borne infections
– Targeted and painless surgery using AI/ VR.
– Connected care pre and post discharge
Q6: What are the aspects of Connected Care for the Patient Care Continuum (https://twitter.com/HCITExpert/status/692309239570628608):
Swetha Jegannathan: Connected care for patient care continuum would include:
1. Preventive health – with regular check-ups, timely alerts and early interventions
2. In-Patient Care – Personalised treatment enabled by technology
3. Post operative care – Remote tracking, consulting and treatment follow-ups using telemedicine and diagnostic tools.
Q7. Please share usecases for Connected Care for: Healthy Living, Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment, Homecare:
Swetha Jegannathan: The use case suggested is based on the premise that it is executed at state level involving the hospitals and care givers.
– The state monitors the citizen’s health using IoT technology – Wearable/ regular check-ups to name a few
– State collects data and, post analysis, alerts the hospitals if there is a deviation from normal
– Concerned citizen and the hospital are in touch and the identified individual is put on preventive treatment with periodic observation of the readings
– If the preventive treatment is successful, then sustenance is monitored through home care including life style changes
– If the preventive treatment is not working for the individual, further investigation is encouraged.  Post investigation, if the individual is diagnosed with the suspected condition, the relevant treatment procedure is given to the individual.
– Monitoring of the progress of the individual’s condition during the treatment is an important step
– On conclusion that the treatment is successful, the hospital, through IOT, will monitor the relevant data periodically.
– The hospital and the individual may decide to have remote follow up consultations till the individual is deemed to be healthy again and there are no signs of relapse.
Q8: What are the Healthcare based Smart City components? How can Local, State and National Government’s make #IoT solutions in healthcare economically viable?:
Swetha Jegannathan:
The following are the healthcare based Smart City components:
– Digital e-health and m-health systems
– Remote patient monitoring leading to customised treatments and medication
– Devices and wearables linking patients with remotely present doctors and nurses
– Data anonymisation
– New innovations on sharing medical learnings that are digitally collected
– Common medical data standards for collection, distribution, analysis and retrieval

The implementation of the Smart City concept in healthcare can be achieved by having a model district containing the above components.  This model needs to be continuously monitored and course corrected (wherever relevant) for it to be successfully expanded to the state, other states and finally the country.

Healthcare based Smart City components, if implemented efficiently, will lead to optimisation of the healthcare costs incurred by the governments.
Q9: How can private hospitals justify the RoI’s of Smart Hospital Components? :
Swetha Jegannathan: Thought, the initial investment and efforts required may be enormous, the patient convenience and hospital resource optimisation through the process streamlining will be worth the efforts and the investment. With the entire patient record being seamlessly available to all the relevant stakeholders, significant savings will be achieved in collecting, sharing and transcribing data – in terms of cost and time. This would also minimise medical errors and, in turn, enhance the reputation of the hospitals in the long run.
Q10: Give us a Buzzword we are going to be hearing regarding IoT based innovations in Healthcare.:
Swetha Jegannathan: Human barcoding
Q11. Tell us a 5 Year view of IoT in Healthcare and what would a Patient Experience in a Smart Hospital?:
Swetha Jegannathan: In 5 years the patients should be able to experience hospitals as wellness clinics with patient centric design in both service and delivery being the priority. This would be achieved if the following plan in implemented in a systematic manner:
– The patient will be assigned to the nearest healthcare facility by the smart city based healthcare network algorithm
– When the patient walks into the hospital (without any physical file), the face recognition technology will retrieve his records and direct him to appropriate department for treatment and physician without any wait time
– Incase of further investigation, the medical record will be sent to the nearest laboratory that then collects the samples from the patient and send the results to the hospitals online for further deciding treatment protocol, including surgeries and therapies. Alternatively for some tests FDA approved diagnostic mobile applications can replace the laborious laboratory tests and share the results instantly with the hospital over the data cloud
– Painless surgeries with targeted robotic precision will be the norm
– During the treatment course (either as in-patient/ out-patient), medical prescription is shared electronically with the pharmacy that delivers the medicine to the patient
– Home care will be an extension of the hospital care with the wearables monitoring the patient’s health and alerting medicine/ therapy schedule
– Physicians will do remote consulting for acute cases, thus freeing them and hospital facilities to attend to only chronic patient in person
– After the recovery stage, the IoT based diagnostic kits will be used to monitor the health of the patient remotely and alert any relapse or detect a new condition

Thus, seamless integration of health system and data without human intervention (or edits) will greatly reduce medical errors and enhance the patient experience.
Q12. Finally: What areas of IoT based innovations are you looking to partner with Startups for? Can you give us two areas?:
Swetha Jegannathan: – Technologies looking at reducing or eliminating the radiation effects of radio frequency that is so central to IoT use cases.
– Smart human centric designs to make healthcare more patient centric without compromising on the human touch.


Stay tuned to the #IoT in Healthcare Blog series Bookmark this link to follow on the insights being shared by the experts on the HCITExpert Blog:

Author
Swetha Jegannathan

Swetha is a lifescience/ healthcare IT consultant with focus on business flow, pre and postsale lifecycle of a software. She has been fortunate to be part of different sub-sectors within the health and life science vertical, be it e-health and m-health at Eli-Lilly Co-Innovation lab for HCL, Singapore or Clinical Data Management & Computation and Laboratory Information Management Software (LIMS) suite at Phase Forward – Waban Software group (now acquired by Oracle) and Ocimum Bioslutions. She has catered to clients across major pharmaceutical majors in US, Europe and South East Asia.

She was instrumental is setting up the DNA sequencing wet lab for MWG Biotech (Now Eurofins), a German company, when they were establishing their base in India in 2004.

Swetha is also passionate about promoting green businesses and innovations that are socially relevant, economically viable and environmentally sustainable. An advocate and practitioner of natural living, she has also done social work assignments with focus on sustainable agriculture, food security and environment. (nominated for the UN Online Volunteering Award in 2010 and her volunteering work was published in UN Online Volunteering newsletter March 2011) and covered in The Strait Times, Singapore national daily.

Specialties: Digital health, Green business, Start-up facilitator, Business Analysis, Consulting, Entrepreneur, Marketing, Social Media, Project Management, Presentation Skills, Networking.

Blog Series: #IoT in Healthcare By Rajesh Batra, @rbatra868


The opportunity in #healthcare IoT is estimated to be $2.5 trillion by 2025. How are we embracing this change? The Types of Opportunities that present themselves to the Startups, Healthcare IT organisations are tremendous.
During the #PhilipsChat, on the 10th April 2017, we asked the experts what they thought about the current trends and focus areas that the IT Industry, Medical Device Manufacturers, Hospitals and Startups will need to keep in view in the near and short-term while making their organisation ready for the Digital Transformation that can be and will be enabled by #IoT in Healthcare.  
Presenting the insights shared by Rajesh Batra (@rbatra868), VP-IT, Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital, Mumbai on #IoT in Healthcare #PhilipsChat.

Q1: In the near term (1-3 years), What are the top 3 innovations in IoT that can benefit healthcare?:
Rajesh Batra: Home care and home physiotherapy

Q2: Is an IoT based system going to be a utility or a service?:
Rajesh Batra: Service

Q3. Do you see any device, connected via any protocol and with any cloud; as the future, if yes how will that be achieved? Standards?:
Rajesh Batra: Yes. Even today, there are trials going on for pregnancy related data coming to hospitals. Elderly care is also happening

Q4: In India (or your country), what are the Digital Infrastructure requirements for enabling IoT based Innovations in Healthcare?:
Rajesh Batra: The cost for thin broad band, which is used in IoT needs to come down

Q5. How can hospitals leverage #IoT based solutions for service delivery and patient care? :
Rajesh Batra: It is an eco system under evolution. We need to wait for a couple of years, when hospitals will be focused on delivery through IoT

Q6: What are the aspects of Connected Care for the Patient Care Continuum (https://twitter.com/HCITExpert/status/692309239570628608):
Rajesh Batra: Elderly care and Preventive care

Q7: What are the Healthcare based Smart City components? How can Local, State and National Government’s make #IoT solutions in healthcare economically viable?:
Rajesh Batra: Not sure of Government role in IoT. It is best done in Public Private partnership to keep it viable. Government can’t be responsible for service delivery. However, government can look into duties for devices and cost of thereof and cost of thin broadband.

Q8: How can private hospitals justify the RoI’s of Smart Hospital Components? :
Rajesh Batra: As said, it is an evolving service. So it needs to be watched closely

Q9: Give us a Buzzword we are going to be hearing regarding IoT based innovations in Healthcare.:
Rajesh Batra: Home care and Elderly care

Q10. Tell us a 5 Year view of IoT in Healthcare and what would a Patient Experience in a Smart Hospital?:
Rajesh Batra: Refer to my presentation at Philips Innovation day https://youtu.be/oxllMGzp6gI

Q11. Finally: What areas of IoT based innovations are you looking to partner with Startups for? Can you give us two areas?:
Rajesh Batra: At the moment, we are in the process of implementing Beacons for a better patient experience at the hospital.

References

  1. Here is the original Blog Post announcing the #PhilipsChat Tweetchat : http://blog.hcitexpert.com/2017/04/philipschat-on-iot-in-healthcare.html
  2. Curated list of Tweets from the #PhilipsChat: https://twitter.com/i/moments/852242427008233473
  3. Review the #PhilipsChat Transcript & analytics via @symplur here >> http://hcsm.io/2loNiv7
  4. [VIDEO] IT to #IoT in Healthcare by @rbatra868 via @PhilipsBlore  https://youtu.be/oxllMGzp6gI

Stay tuned to the #IoT in Healthcare Blog series Bookmark this link to follow on the insights being shared by the experts on the HCITExpert Blog:
Author
Rajesh Batra

VP-IT at Kokilaben Dhirubai Ambani Hospital. Responsible for HIS, ERP implementation along with IT infrastructure initiatives and IT Operations and new IT initiatives.

Blog Series: #IoT in Healthcare by Manishree Bhattacharya @ManishreeBhatt1


The opportunity for #IoT in Healthcare is estimated to be $2.5 trillion by 2025. How are we embracing this change? The Types of Opportunities that present themselves to the Startups, Healthcare IT organisations are tremendous.

During the #PhilipsChat, on the 10th April 2017, we asked the experts what they thought about the current trends and focus areas that the IT Industry, Medical Device Manufacturers, Hospitals and Start-ups will need to keep in view, in the near and short-term, while making their organisation ready for the Digital Transformation that can be and will be enabled by #IoT in Healthcare.  
Presenting the insights shared by Manishree Bhattacharya (@ManishreeBhatt1) on #IoT in Healthcare

Q1: In the near term (1-3 years), What are the top 3 innovations in IoT that can benefit healthcare?
Manishree Bhattacharya: 1. Remote monitoring of (cardiac disorders, COPD, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, insomnia, diabetes, elderly, expecting mothers)
2. An integrated/connected surgical room, where devices are interoperable, regularly feeds in data into patient profile in EMR, to streamline post-operative care, both in the hospital and beyond, at patient homes
3. IoT for ensuring drug/treatment adherence, such as sensor-based pills
Q2. Do you see any device, connected via any protocol and with any cloud; as the future, if yes how will that be achieved? Standards?
Manishree Bhattacharya: Right now, developments are quite random and sporadic. To achieve larger goals, moving from connected devices to connected hospitals, some level of standardization and uniformity will be important to ensure an error-free, and secured transmission.
Q3: In India (or your country), what are the Digital Infrastructure requirements for enabling IoT based Innovations in Healthcare?
Manishree Bhattacharya: Seeing Digital Health take off in India in its full bloom is one of my wishes, and the preliminary requisite would be to encourage hospitals go paper-less – have EHR systems implemented, with a timeline set for nation-wide implementation. Just imagine how seamless healthcare delivery will be if primary, secondary and tertiary centres are integrated – data can seamlessly flow from one centre to another. Government has a very strong role to play here, that will help in creating the right infrastructure, timely adoption, establishing standards, lowering costs by promoting local manufacturing, and boosting HealthIT start-ups.
Q4. Please share use cases for Connected Care for: Healthy Living, Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment, Homecare:
Manishree Bhattacharya:
Healthy Living – Most consumer IoT devices aim to do that – tracking exercise regimes, diet plans
Prevention – Say a heart patient puts on a wearable device that continuously monitors and sends signals to nurses/doctors for any aberration – this can ensure timely treatment and prevent a severe episode.
Homecare – A person who has just had a surgery, and is on homecare – his regular vitals, diet plan, outputs are remotely being tracked by the doctor/nurse – who can selectively revise the diet or post-surgery recovery plan. Same goes with elderly who are on home-care.
Treatment – A sensor-based pill that sends a signal to a care-giver on ingestion of the pill.
The bigger purpose – We know that not all medicines work on every patient. Regularly tracking patients not only help in timely interventions, and more personalized treatments, it also opens routes to more clinical research on personalized medicines.
Q5: What are the Healthcare based Smart City components? How can Local, State and National Government’s make #IoT solutions in healthcare economically viable?
Manishree Bhattacharya: Answering to how can government make IoT solutions viable, my thoughts would be:
  1. By promoting indigenous manufacturing to curb costs
  2. Incentivising IoT adoption in hospitals
  3. Prioritizing HealthIT in the overall start-up agenda
Q6: How can private hospitals justify the RoI’s of Smart Hospital Components?
Manishree Bhattacharya: By improving quality of care; reducing hospital re-admissions, yet prolonging the care process that extends to one’s home; and finally improving patient engagement/adherence. A patient is more likely to visit a doctor who can provide a more personalized treatment than the one who cannot. Important would be define these key metrics/KPIs right at the beginning of implementation.

Q7. Tell us a 5 Year view of IoT in Healthcare and what would a Patient Experience be in a Smart Hospital?
Manishree Bhattacharya: First, we have to understand the purpose of IoT in healthcare – it is not there just for the sake of it, but to truly enable a coordinated and long-term care, that would eventually reduce mortality, morbidity, and hospital re-admissions. Patient experience is bound to improve. A patient will not have to run from one department to another, narrating the whole problem and showing multiple reports. So when a cancer in-patient enters a psychologist’s office, and the doctor already knows the problem, and also has the latest vitals of the patient right in his tablet, he knows that the patient was not able to get any sleep the previous night and has a high BP right now. The doctor would hence probably choose to talk about things that can ease the patient’s current situation. Now, that is truly an enriching experience.

Looking ahead in the future, we may also have AI-enabled voice assistants that will make a patient more comfortable in hospital settings.
Q8. Finally: What areas of IoT based innovations are you looking to partner with Startups for? Can you give us two areas?
Manishree Bhattacharya: Would love to connect with any start-up that can provide meaningful solutions for the Indian healthcare landscape. What I would also like to see is how these start-ups are using the tonnes of data that IoT devices generate, in deriving meaningful analysis – big data, AI, and so on.

References

  1. Here is the original Blog Post announcing the #PhilipsChat Tweetchat : http://blog.hcitexpert.com/2017/04/philipschat-on-iot-in-healthcare.html
  2. 3 ways in which Information Technology can improve healthcare in India by Manishree Bhattacharya (@ManishreeBhatt1) on NASSCOM Community
  1. IoT in India – The Next Big Wave by NASSCOM http://www.nasscom.in/iot-india-next-big-wave
  2. Curated list of Tweets from the #PhilipsChat: https://twitter.com/i/moments/852242427008233473
  3. Review the #PhilipsChat Transcript & analytics via @symplur here >> http://hcsm.io/2loNiv7
Stay tuned to the #IoT in Healthcare Blog series. Bookmark this link to follow on the insights being shared by the experts on the HCITExpert Blog:

http://blog.hcitexpert.com/search/label/IoT%20in%20Healthcare

Author
Manishree Bhattacharya

Manager – Research & Advisory at NASSCOM
Business professional with 7+ years of experience in research and advisory, across IT, healthcare, and medical technologies. At NASSCOM, responsible for identifying digital opportunities, driving thought leadership/innovation and delivering actionable insights for the Indian Technology Industry

Blog Series: #IoT in Healthcare by Dave Brown (@QiiQHealthcare)


The opportunity #IoT in Healthcare is estimated to be $2.5 trillion by 2025. How are we embracing this change? The Types of Opportunities that present themselves to the Startups, Healthcare IT organisations are tremendous.

We asked experts what they thought about the current trends and focus areas that the IT Industry, Medical Device Manufacturers, Hospitals and Startups will need to keep in view in the near and short-term while making their organisation ready for the Digital Transformation that can be and will be enabled by #IoT in Healthcare.  

Presenting the insights shared by Dave Brown (@QiiQHealthcare) on #IoT in Healthcare.

Q1: In the near term (1-3 years), What are the top 3 innovations in IoT that can benefit healthcare?:

Dave Brown: Great user-centered design; cheaper sensors; integration-friendly cloud services (including ML and AI).

Q2: Is an IoT based system going to be a utility or a service?:
Dave Brown: The UI -where the rubber meets the road- is a service. The software behind it is also a service. I can see some of the hardware elements and networking tech’y being a utility.

Q3. Do you see any device, connected via any protocol and with any cloud; as the future, if yes how will that be achieved? Standards?:
Dave Brown: More public exposure of performance metrics will incentivize QI and therefore innovation. Free-market competition (between innovators) will drive down costs. With this accelerated change, risk will rise – this can’t be avoided. However, reliability and data security standards will stabilise risk.


Q4: In India (or your country), what are the Digital Infrastructure requirements for enabling IoT based Innovations in Healthcare?:

Dave Brown: Not sure.  But to my previous answer – system reliability and security standards will help confidence levels for healthcare providers who are frightened of change.

Q5. How can hospitals leverage #IoT based solutions for service delivery and patient care? :
Dave Brown: Start with the big picture in mind; begin with small, measured implementations, and look for IMPACT.  Advance quickly as success metrics show up.

Q6: What are the aspects of Connected Care for the Patient Care Continuum
Dave Brown: Healthy Living, Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment & Home Care. THIS DOES NOT HAPPEN WITHOUT PROGRESSIVE APPROACHES TO INTEGRATION. The future = API’s.

Q7. Please share usecases for Connected Care for: Healthy Living, Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment, Homecare:
Dave Brown: One simple picture: a FitBit user shares their data with their provider network; always-on data analysis (that also taps the user’s genomic data) triggers alerts when bad signs arise; then an automatic clinical response launches to address the issue before it becomes a serious problem. This process is AI-driven.

Q8: What are the Healthcare based Smart City components? How can Local, State and National Government’s make #IoT solutions in healthcare economically viable?:
Dave Brown: BIG question – hard to predict – creative and informed entrepreneurs will come up with many. I think these IoT solutions emerge from a vibrant startup community. Governments assist merely by creating incentives for the birth&growth of well-run startups, including spurring investment. They can also help round up healthcare executives and tech entrepreneurs to thoughtfully examine REAL problems and viable solutions (to save entrepreneurs from building solutions that no-one will buy and deploy).

Q9: How can private hospitals justify the RoI’s of Smart Hospital Components? :
Dave Brown: Similar answer as Q2a: start small and measure measure measure.

Q10: Give us a Buzzword we are going to be hearing regarding IoT based innovations in Healthcare.:
Dave Brown: Not sure.  How ’bout: “Smart API’s”

Q11. Tell us a 5 Year view of IoT in Healthcare and what would a Patient Experience in a Smart Hospital?:
Dave Brown: It’ll take more than 5 years for a real transformation to occur. But as I’ve already written, more good data (genomic + real-time consumer sensors) with strong AI will increase proactive community interventions, thus reducing the demand on urgent care.

Q12. Finally: What areas of IoT based innovations are you looking to partner with Startups for? Can you give us two areas?:
Dave Brown: We ARE a startup, committed to helping redesign workflow in urgent care.  We need to partner with companies contributing to acute care IT. We eventually need to integrate with community-care solutions to further improve the patient experience in moving from community care to acute care.

You can contact QiiQ Healthcare via their website: http://QiiQHealthcare.com
You can reach Dave via Twitter: @DaveBrutusBrown

References

  1. Here is the original Blog Post announcing the #PhilipsChat Tweetchat : http://blog.hcitexpert.com/2017/04/philipschat-on-iot-in-healthcare.html
  2. Curated list of Tweets from the #PhilipsChat: https://twitter.com/i/moments/852242427008233473
  3. Review the #PhilipsChat Transcript & analytics via @symplur here >> http://hcsm.io/2loNiv7

Stay tuned to the #IoT in Healthcare Blog series Bookmark this link to follow on the insights being shared by the experts on the HCITExpert Blog:

http://blog.hcitexpert.com/search/label/IoT%20in%20Healthcare

Author
Dave Brown

Co-Founder at QiiQ Healthcare, designer/engineer – perceptive, meticulous, smart and sensible
leader/entrepreneur – social, tenacious, visionary and realistic

With age, I’ve become a “big picture” guy, but I can and will roll up the sleeves….

I’ve led small and medium-sized user-facing technology projects: starting with strategy, and flowing right down to the detailed tactical level. I get the P&L picture, and am very comfortable driving execution.

Blog Series: #IoT in Healthcare by Srinivas Prasad M.R. @prsdsrnvs


The opportunity in #healthcare IoT is estimated to be $2.5 trillion by 2025. How are we embracing this change?

During the #PhilipsChat, on the 10th April 2017, we asked questions related to the current trends and focus areas that the Healthcare IT Industry, Medical Device Manufacturers, Hospitals and Startups will need to keep in view in the near and short-term while making their organisation ready for the Digital Transformation that can be and will be enabled by #IoT in Healthcare.
A great discussion ensued that has spawned this blog series. Presenting the insights shared by M. R. Srinivas Prasad (@prsdsrnvs) on #IoT in Healthcare #PhilipsChat. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M._R._Srinivasaprasad)



Q1: In the near term (1-3 years), What are the top 3 innovations in IoT that can benefit healthcare?:
M. R. Srinivas Prasad: In the emerging markets the IOT devices that would play an important role in extending care to the homes and community, would be those that can enable remote monitoring of cardiac patients, COPD patients and pregnancy monitoring in the rural community. These devices could be devices like Connect diagnostic ECG, Low cost but reliable wearables to monitor basic vital signs and breathing patterns and connected intelligent fetal dopplers to help monitor the child during birth helped by midwives

Q2: Is an IoT based system going to be a utility or a service?:
M. R. Srinivas Prasad: This will be a mix of both. It can (also) be an Outcome-based pricing model which is a variant implementation of the Service Model.

Q3. Do you see any device, connected via any protocol and with any cloud; as the future, if yes how will that be achieved? Standards?:
M. R. Srinivas Prasad: Need to adhere to Continua standard for these devices for open connectivity but in the near term I see that cost will prevail over the interoperability standard if regulatory bodies don’t ensure conformance from the start.

Q4: In India (or your country), what are the Digital Infrastructure requirements for enabling IoT based Innovations in Healthcare?:
M. R. Srinivas Prasad: A change in the mindset of going from paper to paperless is needed. Then there is a need to educate hospitals “Software is not free”. In addition, enabling IoT will need reliable telecom networks, work with the ecosystem to set up datacenters. Maturity & innovation around commercial business models will be a need Supporting infrastructure like connected ambulances, trained paramedics & and efficient transportation system will help.

Q5. How can hospitals leverage #IoT based solutions for service delivery and patient care? :
M. R. Srinivas Prasad: Postoperative care can be shifted to the patient’s home. This can help free up beds in the hospital which can help in increase revenue to the hospital from a new patient. Hospital-acquired infections can be reduced and finally, in bringing down the cost of care, the benefit that can be extended to the patient.

Q6: What are the aspects of Connected Care for the Patient Care Continuum?
M. R. Srinivas Prasad: From Philips Healthcare point of view Connected care for the Patient Care Continuum comprises of Healthy Living, Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment and Homecare. Here’s a video that explains these aspects https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xe-KxiiIyNI

Q7. Please share usecases for Connected Care for: Healthy Living, Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment, Homecare:
M. R. Srinivas Prasad: (elaborated on each of the aspects of Connected Care for the Patient Care Continuum)
#HealthyLiving There are many in the market but it is important to choose the right one like the ones which are accurate e.g. Philips watch. Eating healthy food but tasty from an Indian cuisine context means fried food. Philips air fryer helps air fry tasty healthy food.

#Prevention Breathing Fresh & clean air is important for us to avoid pulmonary complications in countries like ours where pollution levels are high. #Philips Air Purifier helps address this issue

#Diagnosis Early diagnosis is critical to increase survival rate and reduce the cost of treatment. Use of AI in helping clinicians early diagnosis and also managing a larger population base can help solve the India challenges. Either for aiding in detection of infectious diseases like TB or identifying lesions from brain and breast scans.

#Treatment Minimally invasive devices are the key here . Low dose interventional X-ray systems or mobile surgery systems . Radiation planning systems which aid accurate and the right dose planning.

#HomeCare Monitoring of post cardiac patients and COPD patients at home. Philips Home Co business in india extends care into the home. This reduces cost of care and also helps the hospital to manage more new patients. Monitoring compliance to medication is another key aspect when extending care to home.

Q8: What are the Healthcare based Smart City components? How can Local, State and National Government’s make #IoT solutions in healthcare economically viable?:
M. R. Srinivas Prasad: Government should step in with policies that support in “giving the last mile connectivity” to decentralize healthcare (and) help in the convergence of Mobile technology, Consumer engagement and Payment reforms.
Additionally, Population management to understand disease profiling, to understand the spread of infectious diseases like malaria, typhoid etc. Smart ambulances. Garbage clearing monitoring. Air quality monitoring device across the city. Adequate availability of AED ‘s and accessible and connected. These are all related to health care.

Q9. How can private hospitals justify the RoI’s of Smart Hospital Components?
M. R. Srinivas Prasad: Demanding solutions from healthcare companies. Looking at OPEx models where the capex requirement is low. Productivity improvement from workflow efficiencies. Productivity gains or clinicians from using AI and smart tools. Better clinical decisions and patient re-admissions which will be enhance patient stickiness and also enhance the brand which will drive more patients to the hospital.

Q10. Tell us a 5 Year view of IoT in Healthcare and what would a Patient Experience in a Smart Hospital?M. R. Srinivas Prasad: A seamless experience which helps the hospital in its business, helps the clinicians make better decisions, helps patients by reducing their healthcare costs and the insurance providers become more efficient and manage their premiums better. A win win for all. Example from the onset of chest pain to early diagnosis, to emergency care, seamless patient data flow into the hospital EMR’s. Flow or patient context and information right through the various departments in the hospital including radiology, cardiology, critical care and also seamless extension of this care into home or the community post discharge and post operative care on remote care settings. A seamless experience in a distributed care environment

Q11. What areas of IoT based innovations are you looking to partner with Startups for? Can you give us two areas? M. R. Srinivas Prasad: Advanced AI models to aid early diagnosis of chronic diseases – Cardiac, COPD, Oncology and Mother and Child space. Smart IOT devices to support Monitoring of patients under various clinical conditions post discharge. Pregnancy monitoring and post natal care. Solutions in the healthcare informatics space and connect care solutions to help extend care into the community and homes

To one other question from Mr. NS Ramnath (@rmnth): On a scale of 1 to 10, where do you think the sensors in wearables in the market today stand?
M. R. Srinivas Prasad: It’s in a very nascent stage but with a huge potential and key to help solve our healthcare challenges.

Mr. M.R. Srinivas Prasad, signed-off from the chat by urging the participants, “let’s define the future of healthcare for a better India and a better world. Technology is key! Cheers

References

  1. Here is the original Blog Post announcing the #PhilipsChat Tweetchat : http://blog.hcitexpert.com/2017/04/philipschat-on-iot-in-healthcare.html
  2. #IoT and #AI: Potent combo redefining healthcare by M. R Srinivas Prasad @prsdsrnvs on Livemint http://www.livemint.com/Opinion/iuOHAO5UCn1qzH2q5JwJvL/IoT-and-artificial-intelligence-Potent-combO-redefining-hea.html
  3. Curated list of Tweets from the #PhilipsChat: https://twitter.com/i/moments/852242427008233473
  4. Review the #PhilipsChat Transcript & analytics via @symplur here >> http://hcsm.io/2loNiv7
Author
M. R. Srinivas Prasad

CEO, Philips Innovation Campus, India

Blog Series: #IoT in Healthcare by Dr. Vikram @drvikram

The opportunity in #healthcare IoT is estimated to be $2.5 trillion by 2025. How are we embracing this change? The Types of Opportunities that present themselves to the Startups, Healthcare IT and Healthcare organisations are tremendous


During the #PhilipsChat, on the 10th April 2017, we asked the experts what they thought about the current trends and focus areas that the IT Industry, Medical Device Manufacturers, Hospitals and Startups will need to keep in view in the near and short-term while making their organisation ready for the Digital Transformation that can be and will be enabled by #IoT in Healthcare.

A great discussion ensued and that has spawned this blog series. Presenting the insights shared by Dr Vikram Venkateswaran (@drvikram) on #IoT in Healthcare #PhilipsChat.


Q1: In the near term (1-3 years), What are the top 3 innovations in IoT that can benefit healthcare?:
Dr Vikram Venkateswaran:
In my opinion, the immediate benefits are in areas where other industries have made progress: cheaper rates for Sensors, Increased security at device and sensor level. Additionally, an Increased integration of sensors and devices with EMR allowing for proactive interventions and remote monitoring for Chronic diseases.
Another aspect is Managing inventory and tagging assets are key for more hospitals, and i think that is an immediate benefit that will accrue.
To the question of, Do you think India will benefit from cheaper portable diagnostic devices or remote treatment a better stead ? asked by Divye Marwah; I would say, both patients and the hospitals will benefit.
Sukesh Kumar: Do you think #AI will help in taking healthcare to the next level?
Dr Vikram Venkateswaran: Its already happening in certain specialties like Oncology
Q2: Is an IoT based system going to be a utility or a service?
Dr Vikram Venkateswaran: Tricky one but I would say a service, with elements of a utility.

Ms. Manishree Bhattachar (@ManishreeBhatt1), Analyst with NASSCOM, “Do you think EHR implementation is a requisite, to go for a full bloom service+utility models for IoT devices?”

Dr Vikram Venkateswaran: I think so personally, without the full view of patient history, proactive intervention; depends on the care priorities for the Hospital.

Q3. Do you see any device, connected via any protocol and with any cloud; as the future, if yes how will that be achieved? Standards?:

Dr Vikram Venkateswaran: That is one of the biggest challenges today, EMR integration with IoT devices for example Wearables, remote pacemakers, Bionic Limbs, lenses with ability to monitor sugar levels and Blood Pressure.

Q4: In India (or your country), what are the Digital Infrastructure requirements for enabling IoT based Innovations in Healthcare?:

Dr Vikram Venkateswaran: Network connectivity and availability of LE sensors is the key, Most healthcare systems are still on paper records, Patient education is the key as well, massive change in perception is required.

Q5. How can hospitals leverage #IoT based solutions for service delivery and patient care? :
Dr Vikram Venkateswaran: Health Checks, remote health monitoring as a service, pro active intervention as a service

Q6: What are the aspects of Connected Care for the Patient Care Continuum?
Dr Vikram Venkateswaran: Interoperability and adherence of standards, increased communication, Change in perception of patients and hospitals

Q7. Please share usecases for Connected Care for: Healthy Living, Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment, Homecare:
Dr Vikram Venkateswaran: Remote monitoring of cardiac pacemakers,  monitoring of blood glucose, Sweat analysis for athletes, Sleep monitoring for patients and athletes

Q8: What are the Healthcare based Smart City components? How can Local, State and National Government’s make #IoT solutions in healthcare economically viable?:
Dr Vikram Venkateswaran: Disease Surveillance, Leveraging weather data to predict disease patterns, Population health management

Q9: How can private hospitals justify the RoI’s of Smart Hospital Components? :
Dr Vikram Venkateswaran: Hospitals can prioritise understanding disease patterns

Q10: Give us a Buzzword we are going to be hearing regarding IoT based innovations in Healthcare.:
Dr Vikram Venkateswaran: Smart Care, Home Healthcare, Remote Health Monitoring, Home Health, Connected care, Connected Health

Q11. Tell us a 5 Year view of IoT in Healthcare and what would a Patient Experience in a Smart Hospital?:
Dr Vikram Venkateswaran: Hospitals to focus on critical care, emergencies and palliative care. Regular check ups and follow ups to be conducted leveraging IoT

Q12. Finally: What areas of IoT based innovations are you looking to partner with Startups for? Can you give us two areas?:
Dr Vikram Venkateswaran: Disease Surveillance, Home Healthcare

References

  1. Here is the original Blog Post announcing the #PhilipsChat Tweetchat : http://blog.hcitexpert.com/2017/04/philipschat-on-iot-in-healthcare.html
  2. #IoT and #AI: Potent combo redefining healthcare by M. R Srinivas Prasad @prsdsrnvs on Livemint http://www.livemint.com/Opinion/iuOHAO5UCn1qzH2q5JwJvL/IoT-and-artificial-intelligence-Potent-combO-redefining-hea.html
  3. Join the #Philipschat on Twitter #IoT in #Healthcare on Monday 10th April 2017, 3 PM – Health Care in India http://healthcare-in-india.net/healthcare-technology/join-the-philipschat-on-twitter-iot-in-healthcare-on-monday-10th-april-2017-3-pm/
  4. Curated list of Tweets from the #PhilipsChat: https://twitter.com/i/moments/852242427008233473
  5. Review the #PhilipsChat Transcript & analytics via @symplur here >> http://hcsm.io/2loNiv7
  6. #IoT & #AI – A potent combination redefining healthcare event by @PhilipsBlore moderated by @drvikram https://youtu.be/6cpeICKV9Fw

Stay tuned to the #IoT in Healthcare Blog Series Bookmark this link to follow on the insights being shared by the experts on the HCITExpert Blog:


Team @HCITExperts [Updated: 29th May 2016]
Author

[tab]
[content title=”About Dr. Vikram Venkateswaran”]

Dr. Vikram Venkateswaran

Dr Vikram Venkateswaran is a healthcare thought leader who writes and speaks about the emerging healthcare models in India and the role technology plays in them.
Connect with me

[/content]
[content title=”Latest Articles”]

[/content] [/tab]

#PhilipsChat on #IoT in Healthcare with @prsdsrnvs and @drvikram

87% of healthcare organizations will have adopted Internet of Things technology


Internet of Things (IoT) in Healthcare, or Internet of Medical Things (IoMT) are seeing an increasing adoption rate in Healthcare Organisations. In a recent study the following statistics were part of the report: [1]

1. 60% of healthcare organizations have already introduced IoT into their infrastructure 

2. In just two years, 87% of healthcare organizations will have adopted Internet of Things technology.

3. The most common area where IoT is being utilized is for patient monitoring and maintenance. 73% of surveyed healthcare executives said they used IoT in this area, while 42% said this was the main use for IoT

4. 64% of respondents said they use IoT for patient monitors, 56% use IoT for energy meters, and 33% use IoT for imaging devices.

5. 80% of healthcare executives said IoT has improved innovation

6. 76% said visibility across their organization has improved, while 73% said they have enjoyed cost savings following the introduction of IoT.

7. 57% of respondents believe workflow productivity will improve as a result of the adoption of IoT, resulting in considerable cost savings

8. 36% believe IoT will create new business models, while 27% said the use of IoT technology would improve collaboration with colleagues and patients.


And here is an #Infographic: IoT in Healthcare: Types of Opportunities, I think it will be apt to share the same with you at this time to review the market opportunity. 

The study however also highlighted the disadvantages to introducing IoT. Such as security risks, with healthcare organisations facing many cases of breaches in the past year. 


The report pointed out, 89% of healthcare organizations that have adopted IoT said they have suffered a security breach as a result, while 49% said malware was an issue.

Coming to the Tweetchat!! I am honored to be considered for hosting the tweetchat with Mr. Srinivas Prasad, CEO, Philips Innovation Campus, in India and Dr. Vikram, Founder and Editor of Healthcare India.



Mr. Srinivas Prasad (@prsdsrnvs), has over 3 decades of experience with various Technology companies. Prior to his current assignment, Prasad was Vice President-IT at FMR India, a leading US Multinational in Bangalore. He has also established and served as General Manager for the Software Architecture Division of Sony in India.

Earlier in his career Prasad worked for Alcatel Business Systems in France and Indian Telephone Industries in various capacities, leading teams in developing telecom products for the Indian and Global markets. Before his current role as CEO-PIC, he headed the Healthcare division at PIC as Sr. Director.

Prasad has an outstanding academic record and holds a Bachelor of Engineering degree in Electronics and Communication and a Masters in Business Administration.

Having a unique distinction of being a Hindu Hitachi Scholar, he has published papers at the Telecom IEEE conferences. Prasad has worked in Japan and France earlier in his career. He has been part of several national committees in India including the CII taskforce to drive Broadband adoption in India.

An ardent cricket enthusiast he has played for Karnataka state, South Zone and represented the Country earlier in his career. Read more about Prasad and his achievements at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M._R._Srinivasaprasad.


Dr. Vikram Venkateswaran
(@drvikram)
Dr. Vikram Venkateswaran is a healthcare management thinker, speaker and author. He is also the founding editor of Healthcare India. He started his career as a dental surgeon running a chain of dental clinics in New Delhi. He has an MBA from IMT Ghaziabad and has worked with healthcare systems in India, US and Europe.

On April 10th, 2017 between 3 – 4pm IST, I would like to welcome all experts to share their thoughts and insights with Mr. Srinivas Prasad and Dr. Vikram  on how to leverage IoT in Healthcare.

Agenda for #PhilipsChat : #IoT for Healthcare

Q1: In the near term (1-3 years), What are the top 3 innovations in IoT that can benefit healthcare?

Q2: Is an IoT based system going to be a utility or a service?

Q3. Do you see any device, connected via any protocol and with any cloud as the future, if yes how will that be achieved? Standards?

Q4: In India, what are the Digital Infrastructure requirements for enabling IoT based Innovations in Healthcare? 

Q5. How can hospitals leverage IoT based solutions for service delivery and patient care? 

Q6: What are the aspects of Connected Care for the Patient Care Continuum (tell us about one solution each that can benefit consumers)

> Healthy Living
> Prevention
> Diagnosis
> Treatment
> Homecare


Q7: What are the Healthcare based Smart City components? How can Local, State and Indian Government’s make IoT solutions in healthcare economically viable?

Q8: How can private hospitals justify the RoI’s of Smart Hospital Components? 

Q9: Give us a Buzzword we are going to be hearing regarding IoT based innovations in Healthcare.

CT: (Closing Thoughts) Tell us a 5 Year view of IoT in Healthcare and what would a Patient Experience in a Smart Hospital?

Signoff: And everyone’s favourite question of the Tweetchat, What areas of IoT based innovations are you looking to partner with Startups for? Can you give us two areas?

To participate, just log onto your twitter account on mobile, web or tablet on 10th April Between 3-4pm, as mentioned earlier and tweet with the hashtag: #PhilipsChat 

Transcript of the #PhilipsChat

References

  1. 87pc Healthcare Organisations to Adopt Internet of Things Technology by 2019
  1. #Infographic: IoT in Healthcare, Types of Opportunities http://blog.hcitexpert.com/2016/05/infographic-iot-in-healthcare-opportunities.html
  2. The Current Status of 8 Future Technologies on Healthcare by @msharmas http://blog.hcitexpert.com/2016/09/the-current-status-of-8-future-technologies.html


Author

[tab]
[content title=”About Manish Sharma” icon=”fa-heart”]

Manish Sharma

Founder HCITExpert.com, Digital Health Entrepreneur

Connect with me via any of my Social Media Channels

[/content]
[content title=”Latest Articles”]

[/content] [/tab]

Patient Satisfaction: IoT Enabled patient pathway by Arnab Paul, @iArnabPaul

They may forget your name, but they may never forget how you made them feel… Maya Angelou


Patient satisfaction is not a clearly defined concept, although it is identified as an important quality outcome indicator to measure success of the services delivery system

Ever since the Institute of Medicine’s 2001 ‘Crossing the Quality Chasm’ report codified patientcenteredness as one of six health care quality aims, patient-centered care has gained footing within the landscape of health care reform. There is no consensus between the literatures on how to define the concept of patient satisfaction in healthcare. In Donabedian’s quality measurement model, patient satisfaction is defined as patient-reported outcome measure while the structures and processes of care can be measured by patient-reported experiences




Many of our Linkedin friends would concur that even if we run a million dollar enterprise and have a fairly good experience on dealing with stressful situations in our everyday business life but when it comes to visiting the hospital we get cold feet – because of the element of unforeseen and unexpectedness of the entire process that we have to undertake and on top of that we as a patient community do not have a collective voice and it makes matters worse.

I believe we have a tremendous potential as a nation provided that we as a provider and receiver of healthcare services are on the same page, though it is easier said than done.Patient who visits a hospital is looking for value on investment (VOI) and the Provider is looking for return on investment (ROI). Healthcare providers have their limitations, financial and otherwise — but at least they are doing their bit and performing reasonably well. Since they have fixed resources at their disposal – the only thing humanly possible for them is resource optimization.

In India, we have already missed the bus when it comes to patient satisfaction surveys unlike our western counterparts. For everything in life we need some kind of metrics, some tools to measure the clinical outcome and the patient satisfaction. So to make up for it may I suggest we incorporate Tech enabled, IoT optimized patient feedback mechanism.

Various Accreditation bodies like NABH, NABL, CAP, JCI and ISO are functioning in the healthcare domain but these are mostly voluntary, these accreditations are a reflection that the entity has undergone high quality of audit in its internal departments, but does it say anything about the patient satisfaction or patient engagement, the answer is a big NO. In India, one could safely bet that 90% of the patients visiting the hospitals do not have the foggiest notion of what do these accreditation means, entities need to think beyond certifications and accreditation, entities need to educate people, create more awareness among the stakeholders specially the patient community, they ought to let the world know that these organizations have the benchmark this will inspire confidence in the patient community.

So in a truly democratic healthcare system the patient ought to have a voice and a mechanism in place just to ensure that his voice his heard and above all accreditation agencies must also factor in the patient voice.

Few days back I got a very interesting email from someone who heads the ‎Clinical Transformation and Analytics, Clinical Technology and Patient Safety Innovations at a Super Speciality, New Delhi, she enquired about the tech solutions that could be put in place to enhance the patients positive experience,it so heartening to note that the providers are seriously interested in improving the patients experience and by and large I presume most of the providers do want to improve the patients experience.

So what is the solution, how do we propose to go about it, well unlike Press Ganey & HCAPHS, I don’t know of any organization in India working towards the goal of providing patient satisfaction survey. Press Ganey has stated that a minimum of 30 survey responses is necessary to draw meaningful conclusions from the data it receives and that it will not stand behind statistical analysis when less than 30 responses are received. The entities mentioned above are highly detailed paper based patient feedback mechanism, in this time and age we need to think digital, think ahead.

If we go digital & truly real time in the patient feedback mechanism it would greatly enhance the whole patient experience and maybe help to manage solve some of the issues in real time. Wouldn’t it be just great if we incorporate IoT’s in the patient feedback loop, we wouldn’t have to wait for 30 odd surveys to be analyzed we could just go ahead and fix the situation right away if it warrants an action. 

The article was first published in Mr. Arnab Paul’s LInkedIn pulse page, it has been re-published here with the author’s permission
Author

[tab]
[content title=”About Arnab Paul”]

Arnab Paul, CEO, Patient Planet

Globally-minded systems thinker, action-oriented and inspired toward optimizing health outcomes through innovation, creativity, cooperation. Passionate about facilitating the alignment among technology, people and processes to ultimately improve patient experience and the functioning of healthcare.

[/content]
[content title=”Latest Articles”]

[/content] [/tab]

Putting patients at the heart of IoT in India, By Arnab Paul, @iArnabPaul

Patients are the most important stakeholders in the healthcare ecosystem and that they should be empowered to make informed choices.


In a broader sense, the “patient pathway” is the route that a patient will take from their first contact with a healthcare provider or a member of staff, through referral, to the completion of their treatment. It also covers the period from entry into a hospital or a Treatment Centre, until the patient leaves.


In healthcare, there already exists whole gamut of technologies in various states of maturity – wearable devices that are perhaps not yet ready to be used as clinical-grade, beta-versions of monitoring devices, inventory tracking systems already being utilized in hospital operations, etc. The innovations we will see in the coming years will push these to new heights and give health system operations the opportunity to be leaders in adoption of the connected world empowered by the internet of things. Willingness to explore the opportunities presented by this world will be the differentiator between those who leverage the capabilities for optimization and those who stick to what’s been just good enough so far.

Internet of Things (IoT) refers to any physical object embedded with technology capable of exchanging data and is pegged to create a more efficient healthcare system in terms of time, energy and cost. One area where the technology could prove transformative is in healthcare. The potential of IoT to impact healthcare is wide ranging. We’ve already seen an increasing movement towards fitness tracking wearables over the last few years. Imagine a world where your vital signs were being constantly monitored and fed back to your healthcare professional.

Many of us who advocate LEAN in Healthcare, we know that lean stands for removing all that is not required, Simply, lean means creating more value for customers with fewer resources. A lean organization understands customer value and focuses its key processes to continuously increase it. The ultimate goal is to provide perfect value to the customer through a perfect value creation process that has zero waste. The core idea of lean involves determining the value of any given process by distinguishing value added steps from non-value-added steps, and eliminating waste so that ultimately every step adds value to the process. To maximize value and eliminate waste, leaders in health care, as in other organizations, must evaluate processes by accurately specifying the value desired by the user; identifying every step in the process (or “value stream,” in the language of lean) and eliminating non-value-added steps, and making value flow from beginning to end based on the pull — the expressed needs — of the customer/patient. When applied rigorously and throughout an entire organization, lean principles can have a dramatic affect on productivity, cost, and quality.

With the deployment of IoT in healthcare it would enhance the scope of monitoring patients response, since huge zettabytes of data are going to be generated from the many monitoring sensors, if we are somehow able to remove the noise and work on the intelligence derived from it, and if we could somehow wed the intelligent data derived from IoT with the LEAN/ SIX SIGMA tools it would greatly enhance the quality of the patient care pathway. We would be able to do a better job of mapping his entire journey and improve on the patient e care pathway.

IoT in itself wouldn’t be a big help unless the information that is obtained from the sensors and other embedded systems are not synced with data analytics.

These are exciting times for Healthcare Delivery system, after proper deployment of sensors and by the optimum use of other remote monitoring system, suffice to say monetizing the data generated by the IoT would be the principle driver for enterprises and small businesses alike in years to come.

The article was first published in Mr. Arnab Paul’s LInkedIn pulse page, it has been re-published here with the author’s permission
Author

[tab]
[content title=”About Arnab Paul”]

Arnab Paul, CEO, Patient Planet

Globally-minded systems thinker, action-oriented and inspired toward optimizing health outcomes through innovation, creativity, cooperation. Passionate about facilitating the alignment among technology, people and processes to ultimately improve patient experience and the functioning of healthcare.

[/content]
[content title=”Latest Articles”]

[/content] [/tab]

Healthcare IoT Strategy for Entrants & Incumbents by Arnab Paul, @iArnabPaul

The long-predicted IoT revolution in healthcare is already underway, as new use cases continue to emerge to address the urgent need for affordable, accessible care


We are still running around, jumping in the puddle of data mining and other data insights when we are hit by this new wave called ‘Internet of Things” . Typically in the healthcare system the  patients dont really care what sensors will record and transmit and to whom and to where and whether it follows the standard protocol, what they really care about is whether they will be able to get well soon and how this IoT is going to help him have a better quality of life and how soon that would happen.  

Similarly the providers dont care about the tons of data that will be accessible to him, he would be more eager to know the intelligent real time information that would help him diagnose any ailment. However, at the moment, the health monitors, wearables remain largely outside typical care channels. 

One common IoT-enabled wellness monitor, for example, creates, transmits, analyzes, and stores data—but in a database not linked to, and incompatible with, traditional health records.  However useful, the information is unavailable or even unknown to doctors unless patients volunteer it—and, indeed, physically bring it to a visit. There is a gridlock in the flow of information at the aggregate stage. 

Alleviating that gridlock—and integrating prevention and wellness monitors with existing electronic health-records systems—is key to taking full advantage of IoT-enabled devices’ capabilities and keeping people healthier longer. Established health care IT companies, will no doubt find these new business models threatening, considering the new entrants eager to join the fight for customer value.  It is critical that IoT Companies deliberately identify how IoT technology fits into their existing products and strategies, and enables the delivery of transformational innovation. 

Simply using the IoT to enable innovation is unlikely to create sustainable advantage.  Companies should identify areas of high unmet needs and clearly articulate the value they will deliver for their customers. Development should begin with a specific use case in mind and a clear vision of how each stage in the Information cycle will contribute to addressing customer needs. Strategy to access capabilities through in-house development, acquiring companies, or partnering will be necessary. 

In all cases, whether entrant or incumbent, the IoT strategy should be built from an understanding of which care settings and which gridlock the entity seeks to alleviate.  From there, choices as to whether to focus on the setting or the stage of the gridlock will determine the appropriate business model. 

The long-predicted IoT revolution in healthcare is already underway, as new use cases continue to emerge to address the urgent need for affordable, accessible care. 

The article was first published in Mr. Arnab Paul’s LinkedIn Pulse post. The article is reproduced here with the authors permission.  

Author

[tab]
[content title=”About Arnab Paul”]

Arnab Paul, CEO, Patient Planet

Globally-minded systems thinker, action-oriented and inspired toward optimizing health outcomes through innovation, creativity, cooperation. Passionate about facilitating the alignment among technology, people and processes to ultimately improve patient experience and the functioning of healthcare.

[/content]
[content title=”Latest Articles”]

[/content] [/tab]

TRIVENI: A remote patient monitoring solution via @msharmas – Part 2

Introduction to Part 2

In the part 2 of this series, I will endeavour to define the Business Case and the Timelines for the Research and Development of the TRIVENI framework.

In putting across the Business Model Canvas, the effort is to present a case study for Medical Device development in India.

In this blog post I provide the details of the 9 building blocks of the TRIVENI: Business Canvas Model

In the concluding part of the blog, I will provide the Project Plan and effort estimates for developing the TRIVENI platform to cover the Research & Product Development Phase.

Suggested Reading

  1. Unlocking the potential of the Internet of Things | McKinsey on Healthcare
  2. 10 most in-demand Internet of Things Skills – CIO – Slideshow
  3. Analyzing Cost Structure for Medical Device Companies – Market Realist 
  4. Lantronix on “Why Every Healthcare Device Should be Connected to the Internet of Things” | Symmetry Electronics

TRIVENI: A remote patient monitoring solution via @msharmas – Part 1


TRIVENI, a remote patient monitoring solution that is a confluence of three aspects of patient information: 

Data | Medical Devices | Connectivity

Introduction

Just the other day we heard the SpaceX rocket zoom off to the space to deliver a satellite to the geospatial orbit, Rosberg won the 2016 russian grand prix & Mars rover continuously transmitted the images and vital parameters from millions of miles away in the space

The above three scenarios present the ability to stream data in realtime to a base station providing the ability to remotely monitor the performance of a space-craft, a formula 1 car and a remote autonomous vehicle.

Similarly consider the following use cases in relation to a patient in a Healthcare setting:

  • patient information in a Hospital
  • patient in an ambulance or
  • patient under homecare

presents use cases that require remote monitoring of patient information. 

The existing technological paradigms such as IoT, data streaming analytics, connectivity & interoperability allow for a framework to allow for remote patient monitoring in each of the three Healthcare use cases

TRIVENI

I would like to propose TRIVENI, a remote patient monitoring solution that is a confluence of three aspects of patient information

  • DATA
  • MEDICAL DEVICES
  • CONNECTIVITY

Triveni proposes to implement a plug-n-play framework that will allow for easy connectivity between healthcare information sources.

The etymology of the word TRIVENI in Sanskrit means “where three rivers meet”. Similarly, the three aspects of Patient Information need to be integrated to meet the requirements of a remote patient monitoring solution

Focus areas of TRIVENI

Initially to showcase the Proof-Of-Concept for the solution, the above three focus areas will be considered to present as the use cases. Each of the three focus areas present the ability to test the confluence of three aspects of Patient Information defined above

  • Cardiology
    • MI
    • Chest pain
  • Neurology
    • Stroke
    • Head Injury
    • Epilepsy
  • Emergency Services
    • Trauma

Need for TRIVENI

The Tower of Babel (Pieter Bruegel the Elder, c. 1563), a metaphor for the challenges existing in medical device semantic interoperability today

Current Landscape

  • Piecemeal integration creating information silos; leading to difficulty in sharing patient information
  • Silos unable to deliver real-time patient data reliably; leading to lack of data synchronization to ensure latest  time-aligned data
  • Vendor Dependent solutions; leading to internal battlegrounds
  • Lack of semantic interoperability between systems; leading to a tower of babel situation in medical device semantic interoperability
  • Captive investments by healthcare facilities in existing medical devices leading to a long time before the medical devices can be replaced with newer systems with easier connectivity features

The Remote Patient Monitoring Process Flow

 

Typical Remote Patient Monitoring process (adapted from Center for Technology and Aging)

The Center for Technology and Aging indicates a 5 – Step process for Remote Patient Monitoring. The 5 steps are essential to deliver a continuous flow of patient related information to the remote base station monitoring a patient(s) in any of the use cases or the focus areas presented earlier

The Remote Patient Monitoring Process Flow Mapped with TRIVENI Framework Components


It becomes imperative for the solution to incorporate these founding principles of a remote monitoring process into any framework/ product of such a nature. The process steps get implemented in the TRIVENI framework, allowing for the continuous monitoring of patient information from the various connected systems.

The processes allow for a modular approach to the Product Definition of the TRIVENI framework, with the ability for each component of the platform to evolve as dictated by its internal technology and thus enables each component to incorporate newer technology paradigms as and when they present themselves

The TRIVENI Components are

  1. TRIVENI Connect ®
    1. A programmable Connector that allows the transmission of data from the connected medical device
    2. Supports BLE, Wireless technologies
  2. TRIVENI  Hub ®
    1. A Medical Device Data Aggregator that has the ability to receive data from the TRIVENI Connect and transmit the patient vital data streams to the TRIVENI Exchange
    2. Supports 2G, 3G, Wifi, 4G networks
  3. TRIVENI  Exchange ®
    1. TRIVENI Exchange is a secure, reliable patient vital data store that can seamlessly transmit data received from TRIVENI Hub to TRIVENI Apps
    2. SSL Security, supports interoperability, Data Delivery to TRIVENI Apps or Connected EHR Systems (via HL7)
  4. TRIVENI Apps ®
    1. TRIVENI Apps have the ability to securely receive identified patient’s Medical Data from the TRIVENI Exchange
    2. TRIVENI Apps are delivered on Android, iOS, Web-based platforms


TRIVENI Connect

The TRIVENI Connect is a device that acts as a converter that allows any medical device to connect to the TRIVENI system. The Connect device for instance will be connected to a Patient Monitor via the RJ45, RS232-to-USB converter.
Once connected, the TRIVENI Connect will automatically download the relevant driver from the TRIVENI HUB, that allows for the Patient Data Stream from the Monitor to be streamed. Additional features of the TRIVENI Connect are: 

  • Has the ability to Fetch Data from the connected Device
    • No. of Manufacturers
    • No. of Devices
    • One TRIVENI Connect per Device
  • Convert Data from Device by encoding Device Data with Following information
    • Device ID, Manufacturer ID
    • Device Type
    • Patient ID
    • Ambulance ID/ Hospital ID
  • The TRIVENI Device Should be configurable with the above data. Additional capabilities of the TRIVENI Connect are:
    • Allow for Access Point Configuration
    • Via PC/ Via mobile device
    • Configure the TRIVENI Exchange IP
    • Send Data to TRIVENI Exchange
  • Software Upgrade:
    • Via PC
    • Over the Air
  • Linux Based, WiFi USB Dongle with a RS232 – USB Converter

TRIVENI HUB

The TRIVENI HUB is a device that acts as a data aggregator device at the remote location. All the Patient Data streams from various connect devices are routed to the HUB.

The HUB can be configured via a mobile app. Using the mobile app the users will be able to configure various aspects of the TRIVENI HUB like the internet connectivity, TRIVENI Connect linked to the HUB, Username and password configuration of the HUB & Connect devices, Store and forward configuration to name a few.
 

The HUB device has the following features: 

  • Is a WiFi Router + Cellular Modem
  • Has the functionality to work as a patient data stream aggregator with a store and forward feature
  • Has multiple SIM slots or Multiple USB ports for Broadband Connectivity
  • In Ambulance:
    • Will Work as a WiFi Router Access Point for the TRIVENI Connect
    • Will work as a Cellular Modem for Transmitting the data to the TRIVENI Exchange
  • In Hospital:
    • Will work as a WiFi Router Access Point for the TRIVENI Connect
    • Will connect with the Hospital LAN to connect to the Internet
  • Has the ability to store and forward patient data
  • Data streams will be prioritized based on the QoS of network connection
  • Ability to send data packets over multiple networks to reduce packet loss
  • Data aggregation from multiple types of sources other than TRIVENI Connects
  • Maintains the security of the data-on-move over wire and when data-stationary when within the TRIVENI Hub by enabling security protocols (SSL) and encryption of data

TRIVENI EXCHANGE

The TRIVENI EXCHANGE is a Medical Data+Media Server that can be configured as a Virtual / Physical Server. The EXCHANGE has RTP/ RTSP/ RTCP Capabilities for Live Streaming of the Patient Data Streams from each of the HUBs connected to the EXCHANGE. 
The features of the TRIVENI Exchange are 
  • Site Configuration: Allows the Creation of an Identity for a Client (Ambulance Services/ Hospital Provider)
  • Identification/ Allocation of IP Address (Destination IP for Medical Data Streams) for the TRIVENI Exchange
  • Allows the configuration of the TRIVENI Connect’s to stream data to the Identified IP Address
  • Has the ability to update the TRIVENI Connect / TRIVENI Exchange Firmware OTA
  • Has the ability to receive Voice and Data Streams
  • Has the ability to enable Live Streaming of Data, Video and Voice to TRIVENI Apps
  • Linux Based system
  • Virtual/ Physical Server
  • 128-bit Encryption, https, 2-factor authentication enabled
  • Can be Configured for each client in a multi-tenant server configuration.
  • Has a Medical Data Controller module to identify the source and destination of the medical data streams
  • Ability to allow store and forward data on demand
  • Allows data push or pull configurations for the TRIVENI Components
  • Maintains the “device” drivers for various types of patient sources

TRIVENI APPs

The TRIVENI APP is an android or iOS based app. There are two APPs that come with the TRIVENI framework. One APP is for configuring the remote configuration for the connect and the hub devices at the location for the client

Another APP is for configuring the Exchange and for viewing the data being streamed from the various devices connected to the patients in the remote locations

  • Enables Care Anywhere
  • Web-based, Android or iOS based apps
  • Allows for a two way communication between devices
  • Free to download app on the App Store
  • Allows the user to authenticate her credentials
  • Allows two way communication between the Apps between two users
  • Ensures the reliability of the data
  • Security enabled to ensure patient data authenticity
  • TRIVENI Apps will be developed as web-based and subsequently as native apps
  • TRIVENI apps will incorporate the usability guidelines for the healthcare based apps
  • TRIVENI apps can be configured for data push or pull options
  • TRIVENI apps enabled with security and data encryption profiles
  • There are two types of TRIVENI Apps: TRIVENI HUB & TRIVENI EXCHANGE apps to configure remote and base components

Interoperability Considerations for Medical Peripherals

If one was to trace the progression of delivery of printer drivers, it presents an interesting case study regarding how hardware-software interoperability has progressed over the years in the IT industry. And studying these aspects help us to, hopefully in the future define the way Interoperability in the Healthcare Industry should be handled.

Printers have been essential hardware devices that are connected to the software platform (OS) via various types of connectivity platforms, and service the productivity needs of the organisation.

Lets consider the various Printer installation processes we have seen in the past

  1. CD with OS compatible drivers: Printers started out as peripherals that required a specific driver to be installed on the system (PC/ Laptop/ Server) that was going to be connected to the printer, via a printer cable
  2. OS with Pre-installed Printer Drivers: Then we progressed to the OS itself having a list of compatible drivers that enabled the OS to auto-detect the type of printer or peripheral that was connected to the system. This also allowed for network printers to be installed in the network and allowed for the print server to have all the relevant drivers installed just on that server. PCs in the network wanting to use the printer resource, just needed to send the document to the print server.
  3. Cloud Printers: Now a days, it is possible to connect the printer to the cloud via HP-ePrint or google printer services and access the printer from anywhere in the world.

Device & Software Interoperability

Taking learning from the way peripherals interoperability has been handled in the IT industry, Healthcare Interoperability should be a de-facto feature that should be present in most systems

Interoperability needs to be made as a plug-n-play feature in the Healthcare Services and Solutions. What are the various “Peripherals” that need to be connected in the Healthcare Industry?

  •     Healthcare Information Management Systems
  •     Medical Devices
  •     Laboratory Devices
  •     Radiology Devices
  •     Medical Apps

Additional Thoughts on Interoperability

Now the idea for defining the progression of a hardware connectivity w.r.t. The Printer device, is to try and define how medical device connectivity & interoperability should be enabled in the future

Currently, Interoperability is a “Service” that is offered as part of the implementation process by the system integrator or the vendor of the healthcare software. The point is, why should the customer bear the cost of “connecting” the hardware and software OR two software’s within an organisation
In Healthcare we are working towards providing such seamless and plug-n-play connectivity between EMRs, medical devices and now a days, additionally the  mobile health applications.

Suggested Reading

  1. Unlocking the potential of the Internet of Things | McKinsey on Healthcare – http://ow.ly/ykoy300oNJp
  2. 10 most in-demand Internet of Things Skills – CIO – Slideshow – http://www.cio.com/article/3072132/it-skills-training/10-most-in-demand-internet-of-things-skills.html#slide1
  3. 12 Quantified Self Public Health symposium 2014 report: http://quantifiedself.com/symposium/Symposium-2014/QSPublicHealth2014_Report.pdf  (PDF)
  4. Remote Patient Monitoring Lets Doctors Spot Trouble Early – WSJ http://ow.ly/3rHJ10099JP 
  5. What’s New In Indian Hospitals: A Hi-Tech ICU And How It’s Saving http://ow.ly/oPoV300zlpo 
  6. Study: Remote Patient Monitoring Saves $8K Per Patient Annually http://ow.ly/gqy3301Agwh 
  7. Lantronix on “Why Every Healthcare Device Should be Connected to the Internet of Things” | Symmetry Electronics – http://bit.ly/1XC2V0b
  8. #IoT software development requires an integrated DevOps platform – http://ow.ly/eg6p1006N
  9. Remote patient monitoring technology becoming imperative for providers http://ow.ly/xMK4100cAXH #IoT #HITsmIND
  10. Remote patient monitoring: What CIOs can do to make it happen – Health IT Pulse http://ow.ly/w7W3100cAY0 #IoT #HITsmIND
  11. Remote #Patient Monitoring: 8 Trending #Healthcare Infographics https://t.co/drZJmP0fVk
  12. Five innovative examples of #mHealth and #telehealth technologies http://ow.ly/WMFn100cAYk
  13. Big data fuels #telemedicine, remote patient monitoring http://ow.ly/rg3n100cAZ4 
  14. OpenICE – Open-Source Integrated Clinical Environment https://www.openice.info/
  15. Fundamentals of Data Exchange | Continua http://www.continuaalliance.org/node/456
  16. Global Patient Monitoring Devices Market Analysis & Trends – Industry Forecast to 2025 – http://www.researchandmarkets.com/publication/mf3oj2t/3757021

I am looking for partnerships, sponsors to develop this solution. If interested kindly get in touch via email: manish.sharma@hcitexpert.com

Author
Manish Sharma

Founder HCITExpert.com, Digital Health Entrepreneur.

Additional Articles by the Author

  1. Health ID as Patient IDs unifier in India  by Manish Sharma  
  2. 5 Steps towards an Integrated Digital Health Experience in Indian Healthcare in 2016 
  3. Top Healthcare & Digital Health Predictions for 2016
  4. Zen Clinicals: An Activity & Workflow based solution (1 of 3)
  5. RFID in Healthcare: Usecases from Hospitals
  6. 10 Solutions for the Healthcare IT Fringes

Top #DigitalHealth Trends to expect in 2016 by @AmandaShaffer14 @pankajguptadr

Author: Amanda Flowers & Dr. Pankaj Gupta


The article was first published in Healthcare-IT Business Strategy. The article is republished here with the authors’ permission
17 March.2016, India

The Technology has transformed healthcare around the world at a faster rate in the last few years than at any other time in history. There are many exciting innovations poised to help improve patient outcomes and the landscape of healthcare as a whole over the next few years. For 2016, we can expect to see the following IT driven changes in India:
Expanding Telemedicine Services

The telemedicine market in India is expected to reach a valuation of about $18.7 million by 2017, according to Deloitte. Since telemedicine makes it possible to provide needed medical services from a distance, this may be particularly helpful for individuals in rural communities that do not have access to the larger hospitals and centralized facilities. Medical professionals can provide advice to patients and can even consult with patients about specific issues using video chat options.
Greater Integration of SMAC

SMAC, standing for Social, Mobile, Analytics, and Cloud technologies have transformed every business in India and around the world and healthcare is no exception. As medical facilities get on board with using social options, patients will be able to interact with their doctors and obtain information about their health and well being in new and convenient ways. Analytics in healthcare will allow information to be analyzed and cross referenced, assisting with research and outcome improvement.


Mobile integration puts health information at the patient’s fingertips in a way that was not possible in the past. This may help improve outcomes and communications between medical providers and patients in countless ways as the shift to mobile is embraced. The movement from client server to cloud is shifting the industry IT vendor landscape, with many smaller and newer vendors beginning to replace large vendors that have traditionally assisted with IT needs.
Increased Use of Medical Wearable Devices

The use of health and fitness wearables has increased substantially over the past few years and is expected to continue to increase at an ever-faster rate until about 2020. Start-up companies are experimenting with creating wearables featuring health IT features. We may see prototypes emerge this year that allow patients to instantly send remote information about biometric data that is obtained using sensors in various medical wearables. This could allow physicians to spot medical issues much faster.

Improved Mobile Access to Health Insurance

Private health insurance covers about three percent of India’s population. The government health plan covers about eight to nine percent of India’s population, while the rest is paid out of pocket. In 2015 the Parliament passed the Insurance Bill where the FDI in Insurance was raised to 49 percent and health insurance has been declared as a separate business. Also 100 percent FDI was allowed in medical devices. These two policy changes will bring a boom to the mHealth and health insurance market in 2016-2017.We predict Insurance support for mHealth solutions including outpatient visits and chronic disease management or non-communicable diseases [NCD] as it is called in India.

Many companies now also allow individuals to apply for health insurance using mobile apps. In 2016, we can expect to see even greater competition in the industry with more mobile access and improvements in automating the claims process.
More Complete Patient Histories with EHRs

EHR and MDDS for health domain standards were notified in September 2013 and approved in December 2013, respectively. As medical facilities adjust to using systems to keep electronic records, we can expect to see more complete patient histories begin to affect outcomes and standards of care. This is especially true across borders, as many developed nations are now employing the same standards for coding and keeping EHRs. We may see 2016 bring forth improved software that simplifies electronic record keeping, transitions of care, coding, and billing.

Widespread Adoption of Surgical Robots

India has been behind the ball in adopting surgical robots for some time now, but we may see many more robots flood the hospitals this year. Intuitive Surgical, the creator of the U.S. based da Vinci surgical systems, considers India an important market. The Vattikuti Foundation plans to increase the number of surgeons trained to perform robotic surgeries from about 147 currently to 300 by 2020.

IoT Revolutionizing Patient Care

The Internet of Things is an extremely beneficial addition to the medical industry. We expect IoT platforms to emerge that will enable integration of all healthcare applications, devices, and things. Health monitoring devices can track vital patient information such as blood pressure, heart rate, and blood sugar levels every single day and communicate this information to medical professionals. Pacemakers and other medical devices can also be connected so that information is transmitted daily and not just during doctor visits. Medical professionals can directly communicate when information is worrisome and can save time from running unnecessary tests when health signs are good.
CRM Improving Patient Relations

Customer relationship management has always been important, but is now easier than ever because of SMAC technologies and EHRs. Doctors can communicate more freely with patients and can track all interactions for future review. These options will help make doctor/patient relations more personalized. A personalized approach will improve patient satisfaction and may also help to improve outcomes.
Authors

Article By: Dr. Pankaj Gupta

Digital Health Influencer & SMAC / IoT Speaker | Healthcare Business Executive, Chief Medical Informatics Officer at ProMed Network AG | Managing Partner at TAURUS GLOCAL CONSULTING | Director at Taurus Globalsourcing Inc.
Amanda Flowers

a graduate in Psychology, with minor in English Literature and Public Health. She draws on her knowledge of these subjects to create online content that addresses human needs in a simple way. Flowers is currently a freelance health blogger and working for Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC

New Healthcare Aggregators: SMAC and IoT via @pankajguptadr

Author: Dr. Pankaj Gupta

Digital Health Influencer & SMAC / IoT Speaker
15.Feb.2016, India


The old paradigm of business as a linear value chain is now facing extinction. Businesses are now ecologies and not merely producers and sellers ! That requires a change in thinking. Customer Relationship Management (CRM) needs to be a mission at every step of the process. This is hard to overemphasize! The internet is clearly the medium that allows such integration across time and space. It is time to take a more accepting look at Cloud and Social Media technologies. This offers the only universal layer of engagement across stakeholders. The investment in IT hardware as we new it in the past has been greatly optimized by mobile. It has brought a tactile feel to life and work for all of us. Mobile mirrors the nature of Healthcare in terms of immediacy and continuity so well. Healthcare needs to embrace it wholeheartedly. Healthcare can only profit from it.

There is a huge Vacuum in Indian Healthcare-IT space. Large Healthcare-IT vendors have exited the market. Either they lost interest and exited or got bought out e.g. TrakHealth, iSoft. Also the market is moving from client-server to cloud and from Capex to Opex models. New cloud based players are small in size and yet to reach enterprise class. Existing players are not able to shift out to cloud because of their long term negotiated contracts in client-server model. The time is now when full conversion of Enterprise class to SMAC will happen anyways. Healthcare CIOs can keep eyes closed or tighten the belt and ride the Digital wave.

Recently I spoke to a Director of State NHM in India. He said we are doing HMIS and Public health through ANM/ASHA. How do we benefit from SMAC IoT platform? Hard for many to imagine SMAC is a unifying force across enterprises and IoT breaks the silos. This can be quite unnerving for many. 

The era of hierarchical command and control is over. Now is the time for horizontal networking across Communities of Practice [CoP]. Whatever gets the maximum likes becomes the In Thing. Whatever is the In Thing gets used the maximum. Students are learning more from the online networking than from the formal classroom and professors. Research will reach the point of use as soon as it gets published. Primary care Providers in semi-urban and rural areas will have access to latest therapeutic recommendations. The old Adage that ‘Knowledge is the only form of power that is not expendable but grows when shared’ has become true.  

The movie Avatar has beautifully depicted the concept of Small data ^ = Big Data where small knowledge base of each living being [App] is contributing towards the collective consciousness [Big Data] of Eywa. Now the question is will the future of SMAC/IoT be driven by technology or biotechnology?

Anyways for now – The time has come when you don’t need big monolithic HIS software to run hospitals. Now you can do everything with small mobile based Apps for every function. Though I am already seeing many of these Apps in the market but what is lacking is a unified platform on which the Apps should be built such that the data can be seamlessly collated. Also it gives the provider the flexibility to select from a bouquet of Apps. 

IoT integration platforms are emerging that will integrate at the App level, Data level and Semantic level. Anyone in the ecosystem can slice, dice, run reports on the collated data.

Successful Cloud models have dug the grave for the Enterprise Hardware. Capex has got converted to Opex. Now you can pay for the software on the cloud like you pay your monthly electricity bill.

SMAC coupled with IoT has a potential to bring the Aggregator Business model to Healthcare. Soon the unorganised and fragmented primary care, secondary care and supporting care market will begin to get Aggregated. I see these Aggregators becoming larger than established capital intensive Enterprise market similar to what happened in the Automobile market. It will be in the interest of Insurance, Pharma and Govt to go all out and support this emerging SMAC/IoT driven Healthcare Market Aggregation.    

References

Why Healthcare must Re-imagine itself – and how
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/why-healthcare-must-re-imagine-itself-how-arun-kumbhat
Why All Indian Hospitals IT is in Bad Shape
http://healthcareitstrategy.blogspot.in/2014/04/why-all-indian-hospitals-it-is-in-bad.html
Global HIS/EMR vendor nightmare outside US
http://healthcareitstrategy.blogspot.in/2012/08/global-hisemr-vendor-nightmare-outside.html
Thick client vs Thin client
http://healthcareitstrategy.blogspot.in/2008/08/thick-client-vs-thin-client.html
There is no Market for EMR in India
http://healthcareitstrategy.blogspot.in/2012/10/there-is-no-market-for-emr-in-india.html
Size of Healthcare-IT Market in India
http://healthcareitstrategy.blogspot.in/2012/06/size-of-healthcare-it-market-in-india.html 

Please note: The Author of this article is Dr. Pankaj Gupta. The article was first published on Dr. Gupta’s blog. And also on Dr. Gupta’s LinkedIn profile :New Healthcare Aggregators: SMAC and IoT | Dr Pankaj Gupta | LinkedIn

Article By: Dr. Pankaj Gupta

Digital Health Influencer & SMAC / IoT Speaker | Healthcare Business Executive, Chief Medical Informatics Officer at ProMed Network AG | Managing Partner at TAURUS GLOCAL CONSULTING | Director at Taurus Globalsourcing Inc.
Scroll to Top
Connect
1
👋 Hello
Hello!! 👋 Manish here, Thanks for visiting The Healthcare IT Experts Blog !! How can i help you?