TELEMEDICINE

Prepping for a remote, contactless healthcare service delivery in India: The essentials by Anusha Ashwin, @ashwin_anusha

The increased need for an acceleration in digital transformation in a post-COVID world is a no-brainer to understand. Healthcare service providers were rather compelled to adapt and digitally innovate to face the unprecedented pandemic in as less than two to three months, pushing hospital IT infrastructure to go above and beyond to find new ways of attending, responding, and treating to in- and out-patients remotely.

e-Sanjeevani– Dr Sanjay Sood explains how milestones were achieved during pandemic by Anusha Ashwin, @ashwin_anusha

The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare’s digital telemedicine initiative e-Sanjeevani has proved its usefulness and easy access for the caregivers and the medical community, and those seeking healthcare services in the times of COVID-19 pandemic. This is touted as a big push for the ‘Digital India’ initiative laid down by the Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

Recently, as announced on October 29th by PIB, e-Sanjeevani reached a new milestone. So far, e-Sanjeevani has completed 6 lakh tele consultations. As of October 12th, the platform recorded 5 lakh consultations. It took e-Sanjeevani just 15 days to complete the last one lakh consultations.

Telemedicine – An Emerging Trend in Digital Healthcare Revolution by Priyanka Miglani

Digitization of healthcare is a reality today. The industry is evolving at a fast pace and disrupting care delivery and accessibility around the world. Digital technologies have facilitated and improved healthcare in remote and isolated locations. In places struggling with the scarcity of infrastructure and resources, health-tech allows access to specialized services.

#Telehealth and its play in Digital Healthcare by Ambarish Giliyar, @iamgiliyar

By ambarish giliyar, @iamgiliyar

Telehealth and its play in Digital Healthcare

Telehealth is the use of digital information and communication technologies, such as mobile devices, Cloud, Fitness devices, Health devices & sensors, AI-powered Messaging & Chatbot systems and more, to access healthcare services remotely and manage healthcare. These may be technologies you use from home or that your Doctor uses to improve or support healthcare services.

#Telemedicine: Hope, hype, or just jumping through hoops? A perspective for hospitals by Dr. Senthil @drsenthilp , Jai Ganesh and Dr. Sai Praveen @thinkMD

Understandably, telemedicine is an inevitability in these extraordinary times. It is predicted that telemedicine could soon replace up to 30%-40% of in-person consultations. Technology adoption to the propagated scale will bring immense changes to the health system. Here we discuss some of the critical factors for a hospital to consider.

Digital Health In India – Legal, Regulatory and Tax Overview by Nishith Desai Associates, @AntaniMilind et al

The current legal and regulatory landscape that governs Digital Health is scattered and ambiguous. To make matters worse, there is none or very little legal scholarship in the area of Digital Health in India. The scope of Digital Health is vast and covers various business models, which inherently makes it difficult to regulate as a whole.

This paper seeks to knit together existing laws and regulations into what may be called an “ad-hoc” legal framework for Digital Health in India. It is being written for those who are already invested in Digital Health as workforce or capital contributors as well as those who are still testing the waters. Since this is a research paper, it also seeks to raise questions and takes positions which are yet to be tested with the hope that it would set the tone for legal discussions in larger platforms

An Excerpt from the document

How a little virus has made a big change in Healthcare by Dr. Sunita Maheshwari

Post Covid: What will change in healthcare: Tele tele everywhere

When we started Teleradiology Solutions over a decade and a half ago, it was unheard of. The concept was new, untested. Radiologists were raw, untrained, unused to this new way of reporting diagnostic scans which was very different than being in person in a hospital. Bandwidth was expensive, unreliable and weak. However, pre covid-it had become a well oiled global teleradiology healthcare practice with smooth and robust IT enabled, radspa enabled workflows.  And Radiologists typically worked part or full time from home as per their personal preference. So when the 4 hour notice lockdown hit India, we could keep working-from homes in India, from homes in America, from homes globally. Suddenly, everyone realised the potential benefits of what we had been doing for what seems like forever!

Innovative solutions for India to manage critically ill #COVID-19 patients, a five point agenda by Dhruv Joshi and Dileep Raman, @cloudphysician

Dhruv Joshi, Dileep Raman, Cloudphysician

The reality of the Indian healthcare system

The current onslaught of COVID-19 has brought to the fore numerous issues that healthcare systems face worldwide. India, with its COVID-19 case load trailing China, Europe and the US by a few weeks, is almost certain to encounter its healthcare system’s limitations in the coming weeks to months. Many countries today have witnessed a geometric rise in the number of cases of the virus owing to its infectiousness and unique transmission characteristics. Barring unknown climatic effects or significant mutations in the virus, it is likely to follow a similar course in the Indian population. The similarities unfortunately end here. 

📝 Salient points from the Telemedicine guidelines for Family Physicians 🖱️by Dr. Devashish Saini, @RossClinics

Devashish_Saini

📜 General

  • A Registered Medical Practitioner is entitled to provide telemedicine consultation to patients from any part of India
  • The RMPs should exercise their professional judgment to decide whether a telemedicine consultation is appropriate in a given situation or an in-person consultation is needed in the interest of the patient.
  • The RMP shall uphold the same standard of care as in an in-person consultation but within the intrinsic limits of telemedicine.

#Telemedicine Practice Guidelines by @MoHFW_INDIA and some resources

Telemedicine Practice Guidelines

In March 2020, The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India has published the Telemedicine Practice Guidelines for Enabling Registered Medical Practitioners to Provide Healthcare Using Telemedicine

Telemedicine Practice Guidelines, the need of the hour

Disasters and pandemics pose unique challenges to providing health care. Though telemedicine will not solve them all, it is well suited for scenarios in which medical practitioners can evaluate and manage patients.

A Synopsis of MOHFW’s Guidelines for Tele-medicine Services for Ayushman Bharat Health and Wellness Centres (HWCs) by Manish Sharma, @msharmas

The MoHFW, Government of India has published the guidelines for telemedicine services for the Ayushman Bharat – HWC. The Guidelines were notified in August, 2019. This article presents the synopsis of the guidelines.

Manoj Jhalani highlighted the need to transform 1.5 lakh PHC and SHC into Ayushman Bharat HWC(AyB-HWC) based on the Goals defined in the national health policy, 2017 to achieve universal health coverage by 2022.

mfine, the MVP of a “Cloud Clinic” by Prasad Kompalli, @pkompalli CEO & cofounder, mfine @mfinecare

It has been roughly a year since Ashu and I started mfine. During the course of this journey, we studied the healthcare sector very closely and started interacting with people in the ecosystem. The more we learnt, the more we got passionate about healthcare and at times obsessed with it!

Comparison of #telemedicine with in-person care for follow-up after elective neurosurgery: results of a cost-effectiveness analysis of 1200 patients

A Comparison of telemedicine with in-person care for follow-up after elective neurosurgery: results of a cost-effectiveness analysis of 1200 patients using patient-perceived utility scores

TRIVENI: A remote patient monitoring solution via @msharmas – Part 2

Introduction to Part 2

In the part 2 of this series, I will endeavour to define the Business Case and the Timelines for the Research and Development of the TRIVENI framework.

In putting across the Business Model Canvas, the effort is to present a case study for Medical Device development in India.

In this blog post I provide the details of the 9 building blocks of the TRIVENI: Business Canvas Model

In the concluding part of the blog, I will provide the Project Plan and effort estimates for developing the TRIVENI platform to cover the Research & Product Development Phase.

Suggested Reading

  1. Unlocking the potential of the Internet of Things | McKinsey on Healthcare
  2. 10 most in-demand Internet of Things Skills – CIO – Slideshow
  3. Analyzing Cost Structure for Medical Device Companies – Market Realist 
  4. Lantronix on “Why Every Healthcare Device Should be Connected to the Internet of Things” | Symmetry Electronics
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